Cindy McCain Responds To Vicki Iseman Allegations: "I Knew The Truth"

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NBC entertainment show "Access Hollywood" sent out the below press release late Thursday, after conducting an interview with Senator John McCain's wife Cindy that will air Friday and Monday. In February the New York Times implied an romantic relationship had taken place between the senator and lobbyist named Vicki Iseman, to a point where his aides had to step in.

In the interview, Mrs. McCain says, "I was angry at the newspaper of course, but I knew the truth. I didn't have to ask anything or talk to anybody about it. I knew the truth and I know my husband."

She went on to say when the article came out, the first thing she said to her husband of nearly 28-years was, "I love you. I know this isn't true." According to Cindy McCain, he said the "same thing" in response.

Full press release:

In an exclusive interview with "Access Hollywood's" Nancy O'Dell, Cindy McCain opens up about dealing with the rumored romance between her husband Sen. John McCain and lobbyist Vicki Iseman, her previous addiction to painkillers and which first lady is an inspiration to her. The interview airs on "Access Hollywood," Friday, April 11th and Monday, April 14th. Log on to AccessHollywood.com for the video highlights from the interview.

A February story in the New York Times put rumors of a romance between John McCain and Iseman into the national spotlight, a romance that allegedly began during his first run for the White House eight years ago. In response to the article, Cindy McCain told O'Dell, "I was angry at the newspaper of course, but I knew the truth. I didn't have to ask anything or talk to anybody about it. I knew the truth and I know my husband."

Cindy McCain told O'Dell that when the article came out, the first thing she said to her husband of nearly 28-years was, "I love you. I know this isn't true," and according to Cindy McCain, he said the "same thing" in response.

Cindy McCain added, "I think that is the unfortunate side of politics and I think that is also the unfortunate side sometimes of this 24-hour news cycle that we are in now, but it's over with, we have moved on and I am not concerned about it."

Cindy McCain battled an addiction to painkillers in the late 1980s to early 1990s following back surgery. She told O'Dell what she gained from the experience and why she has made the battle public and particularly wants to reach out to women about it. "I think it made me a better person, as well as a better parent, so I think it would be very important to talk about it and be very upfront about it." Cindy McCain added, "I think women are juggling so much...I think women have a greater difficulty sometimes and I would like to make sure that we can talk openly with women and make sure there is an awareness."

Cindy McCain also revealed she has been personally inspired by Laura Bush, Nancy Reagan and particularly Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, telling O'Dell, "She was probably to me, the most representative of what any First Lady would like to emulate in my opinion." In particular, she added, "I think certainly her style, her elegance...not only how she handled her role in the White House, but how she handled herself abroad and I think it is important and it is a fine line that I believe a First Lady or a spouse walks."

Cindy McCain is a member of the Board of Trustees for the HALO Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to landmine removal and weapons destruction in war-torn countries and also serves on the Board of Directors for Operation Smile, a non-profit organization whose mission is to repair cleft lips, cleft palates and other facial deformities for children around the world.

President Bush's cousin Billy Bush is O'Dell's cohost on the program