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Action, Porn Film Industries Excited For 3D Developments


First Posted: 09- 5-08 08:12 AM   |   Updated: 10- 6-08 05:12 AM

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Threed Glasses

In fact, demos of live 3-D have been quietly gaining buzz around the TV world: Last year both the NBA All-Star game and a Dallas Mavericks game were broadcast on a closed-circuit feed using equipment from Pace, the company that Cameron helped start and whose equipment he uses to shoot in 3-D. At the International Broadcasting Conference in Amsterdam in September, Katzenberg is scheduled to deliver a keynote in 3-D live from Los Angeles via satellite and 3ality gear. "This is similar to where we were in 2003 with high-def," Chuck Pagano, executive VP of technology at ESPN, told me. "This is a big win for TV in general, because it is jaw-dropping when you see a football or basketball game in 3-D." (See correction.)

Indeed, one thing the first wave of Hollywood 3-D blockbusters clarified is that 3-D can't make a crummy movie good, but it might make a good movie better. With TV - particularly live TV - it enhances already proven programming. (The porn industry is also drooling over this, for obvious reasons.) As with all newfangled gadgetry, the big question is which standards will prevail: There are already several "3-D ready" displays on the market from the likes of Samsung and JVC, requiring different types of image coding and viewing glasses. In Japan one broadcaster is airing an hour a day in 3-D, and Philips (PHG) has a 3-D monitor for sale that does not require glasses but is, for now, too pricey for mass rollout. "I think the glasses are a necessary evil for the next few years," says Wendy Aylsworth, a Warner Bros. executive who is heading an entertainment industry group's efforts to set technical standards. Still, expect more and better 3-D TVs to be the buzz at next January's consumer electronics show.

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Filed by Dave Burdick  |  Report Corrections