BOOKS
08/30/2010 06:18 am ET | Updated May 25, 2011

China's 7 Secrets Beijing Wants To Keep From Wikileaks ( New York Review Of Books )

Against this background, the WikiLeaks story, which broke the day after the boxun leak, took on a special significance. In emails, tweets, and web postings, Chinese bloggers, both inside China and overseas, began listing key episodes in recent Chinese history that have remained shrouded in mystery and for which they would love to see archives opened:

1. The famine during the Great Leap Forward in 1959-62. Somewhere between 20 and 50 million people died because of bad policy, not "bad weather." What exactly happened? What policies caused the famine and what policies suppressed information on it? How much grain was in state granaries while people starved? Is it true that Mao sold grain to the Soviet Union during those years in order to buy nuclear weapons?

2. The death of Mao's military commander General Lin Biao in 1971. The official version of events, which to this day exists only in bare outline, strains credulity: Mao's "closet comrade in arms" suddenly plotted a coup, failed in it, tried to flee to the Soviet Union, and was shot down in his plane. What really happened? Why? Why shouldn't we know more?

Read more on The New York Review of Books