HUFFINGTON POST

'Parsarly,' 'No Garlic': The Lee Brothers Recreate Marilyn Monroe's Stuffing Recipe

11/10/2010 09:35 am ET | Updated May 25, 2011

THE image of a bombshell cooking her way to nirvana may seem old-hat now, thanks to Nigella, Giada, Padma and the like. But back in the 1950s, a Hollywood starlet was not expected to squander her talents (or risk her manicure) chopping onions.

A new book, however, includes a recipe in Marilyn Monroe's handwriting that suggests that she not only cooked, but cooked confidently and with flair.

"Fragments" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux; $30) collects assorted letters, poems and back-of-the-envelope scribblings that span the time from Monroe's first marriage in 1943 to her death in 1962. Most of the material, however, dates from the late '50s, when she was at the height of her fame, moved to New York, married Arthur Miller and connected with Lee Strasberg and his Actors Studio. Her poignant attempts to assert her intellectual side are what have made news about this collection, but the recipe on Page 180 was a bigger revelation to us.

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