Huffpost Education

Facebook Bullying: Spring Branch School District Investigates Rumor Page

Posted: Updated:
FACEBOOK BULLY
elvyra/flickr

A Burn Book like the one featured in the movie Mean Girls that singles out students and calls them names has led school officials in Texas to launch a district-wide investigation.

The "Spring Woods Book" was removed from Facebook Tuesday after the Spring Branch Independent School District in Texas launched an investigation into the page, KHOU reports. The Facebook site featured insensitive comments and pictures of students. The page's creator is still unidentified.

Miracle Camero, 17, was listed under the "SLUTS" section of the page.

"They put me under slut and they called me the B word and said that I was stuck up and that I'm all over guys that give me a second look," Camero told KHOU.

Cyberbullying has been a hot issue lately, and Camero isn't the only one who's been victim to relentless online taunting.

Last January, 15-year-old Phoebe Prince Hanged herself after being bullied at school and through Facebook. One of her bullies, Sharon Chanon Velazquez, was recently released from Juvenile Court and spoke out on the Today Show last week.

Facebook and Time Warner announced yesterday that they will partner to fight cyberbullying, and Gov. Jerry Brown (D-Calif.) signed into law last week a bill that allows schools to suspend students for bullying their peers on social networking sites like Facebook.

Camero's mother said she was angry about the Spring Woods Book, but the teen said she laughed it off.

"I was like, thank you for using a pretty picture of me, at least," Camero told KHOU.

Around the Web

First cyberbully jailed after Facebook death threats | Mail Online

More cyber-bullying reported to police

Facebook and Time Warner join forces in anti-bullying campaign

Facebook bully ban at elite schools

Websites slow to aid police: commissioner

Facebook blamed for fight between two Melbourne schoolgirls

Sharon Chanon Velaquez charged over Phoebe Prince's murder on 'The Today Show'

Parents talk of Facebook suicide