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Japanese Company Designs Air-Conditioned Clothing (VIDEO)

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The heat has been unrelenting in many parts of the U.S. these past few weeks, but a small Japanese company may have the answer to help you keep cool: shirts equipped with their own air conditioning units.

With Japan facing power shortages and energy restrictions in the aftermath of an earthquake and tsunami this past March, the demand for the air-conditioned jackets with built-in fans designed by Kuchofuku Co. Ltd. has soared reports AFP.

The cost of beating the heat isn't so cool: the least expensive garment costs around 11,000 yen or $130 US dollars. But for the price, those wearing the lithium-ion battery-powered jacket can bask in cool air for up to 11 hours on a single charge, consuming far less power than that used by a normal air conditioner, explains The Standard.

Kuchofuku's air-conditioned garments are not new, but Japan's recent energy saving efforts have triggered a surge in popularity for the jackets and other products like air-conditioned beds and seat cushions, according to The Telegraph.

Several other Japanese companies have come up with additional, interesting wearable ways to keep cool. For example, you migh try out the USB Cooling Necktie, which comes with a small fan in the knot of the tie. Alternately, check out the USB Heating and Cooling Keyboard, that lets you pick adjust the temperature in your workspace. As Travelizmo points out, you could also don the fan-equipped hat, which includes a fan powered by a small solar panel.

Learn more about Japan's air-conditioned outfits in the video below, then check out The Telegraph for more photos of the gear.


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