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Pet Plastic Surgery Gains Popularity

The Huffington Post    
First Posted: 08/23/11 02:35 PM ET Updated: 10/22/11 06:12 AM ET

Ever consider putting your pet under the knife? From silicone testicles to nose jobs, cosmetic surgery for pets is on the rise in some regions of the world, reports The Telegraph.

U.K. insurance company Petplan churned out the numbers based on claims made by British pet owners in 2010.

Not only was there a jump in nose jobs by 25% over three years costing a total of $2.5 million in 2010, but $1.6 million was also invested in eyelifts, says PetPlan.

Then there are Neuticles, the fake, bean-shaped testicles made out of solid silicone, which come in a range of sizes for the neutered dog to maintain pride and self-esteem.

Jim and Jaime Davenport of Atlanta, Georgia opted for the testicular implants for their English Bulldog. In an ABC News interview, the couple explained that it was just too "out there" that their dog, Munson, had been neutered.

The Davenports aren't alone. According to neuticles.com, "over 250,000 pets worldwide have been Neuticled since 1995."

Is this just a growing trend of vain pet owners? Surgical procedures that involve putting an animal under general anesthesia can be life-threatening.

Traditionally, some breeders have been proponents of tail docking and ear folding, which the ASPCA stands against.

"The ASPCA is opposed to elective surgeries that are undertaken solely to conform to breed standards, including cropping ears and docking tails," ASPCA spokesman Bret Hopman wrote in an email statement to The Huffington Post.

Petplan says some procedures offer better comfort and improve a dog or cat's quality life.

American veterinarian Marty Becker told ABC News that an operation isn't normally performed unless there is an underlying medical reason.

For instance, face lifts can reduce the amount of skin sagging from a dog's face if he hasn't fully grown into it and allow him to see again, according to the Daily Mail.

Nose surgeries can also improve breathing problems in pets with flat noses, says PetPlan.

With over half of America's dogs and cats overweight or obese, another popular pet cosmetic surgery is liposuction, according to a Yahoo News video with Dr. Brett Boatsman.

But Boatsman recommends diet pills to deal with weight-loss, instead of surgery.

Quick Poll

Would you get your pet plastic surgery?

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