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Shofar Photos From Around The World

First Posted: 09/28/11 01:11 PM ET   Updated: 09/28/11 01:24 PM ET

A shofar is a horn, traditionally that of a ram, used for Jewish religious purposes. During Elul, the month of preparation before the Jewish High Holidays, Jews are called to teshuvah (repentance/reflection/return) before the new year, and the shofar is a daily wake-up call.

The shofar is primarily blown on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, but it is also used during Sukkot, the Feast of the Tabernacles. The shofar is blown in synagogues to mark the end of the fast at Yom Kippur and blown at four particular occasions in the prayers on Rosh Hashanah. Three main patterns of sound -- tekiah, teruah and sh'varim -- are used when blowing the shofar in a synagogue, and full cycle of sounds numbers 100 blasts.

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  • Shofar Photos

    A Jewish Indian boy blows the shofar to gather devotees around the Torah at the Magen Abraham Synagogue in Ahmedabad on Sept. 9, 2010, on Jewish New Year Rosh Hashanah. Synagogue President Benjamin Reuben numbered the Jewish community in Ahmedabad at 130, with an approximate total of 4,500 members in India whereof the majority, approximately 4,000, live in the financial capital Mumbai. (SAM PANTHAKY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shofar Photos

    Lena Weisman, 10, left, of Crested Butte, Colo., blows a shofar with the help of Cantor Robbi Sherwin during Rosh Hashana services in the mountains of Crested Butte, Colo. on Thursday, Sept., 9, 2010. Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the Jewish new year. (AP Photo/Nathan BIlow)

  • Shofar Photos

    An ultra-Orthodox Jew blows the shofar, a ram's horn, while attending a prayer and protest against the celebration of summer festivals in the city of Jerusalem, Monday, Aug. 11, 2011. The protest was held in the Mea Shearim neighborhood of Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

  • Shofar Photos

    Ultra-orthodox Jewish men blow the shofar, a musical instrument used in Jewish religious ceremonies made from the horn of a ram, ahead of a special prayer for rain, on a boat in the Sea of Galilee, northern Israel, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 2010. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

  • Shofar Photos

    Jewish supporters blow the shofar during during the Euroleague Basketball regular season Group A match againts Maccabi Tel Aviv and Caja Laboral in the Israeli coastal city of Tel Aviv on Nov. 25, 2010. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shofar Photos

    Jewish man blows the shofar during the celebration of Sukkot, or Feast of the Tabernacles, at the Western Wall in the Old City of Jerusalem on Sept. 24, 2010. Thousands of Jews make the pilgrimage to Jerusalem during Sukkot, which commemorates the 40 years of wandering in the desert after the exodus of Jews from Egypt some 3,200 years ago. (GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shofar Photos

    A Jewish man blows a shofar, or ram's horn, as he stands at a viewing point on the Mount of Olives overlooking annexed east Jerusalem, home to the Temple Mount, Judaism's holiest site, and the al-Aqsa Mosque Compound, Islam's thirds holiest site, as Jews celebrate the second day of Rosh Hashanah, Sept. 14, 2007. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shofar Photos

    Jews blow the shofar as they stand at a viewing point on the Mount of Olives overlooking annexed east Jerusalem home to the Temple Mount, Judaism's holiest site and the al-Aqsa Mosque Compound, Islam's thirds holiest site, as they celebrate the second day of Rosh Hashanah or the Jewish New Year Sept. 14, 2007. (JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Shofar Photos

    People gather to attempt to set a new world record for the largest shofar ensemble at Phillips Beach in Swampscott, Mass., Sunday Sept. 17, 2006. (AP Photo/Adam Hunger)

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Filed by Jahnabi Barooah  |