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Draconid Meteor Shower 2011: Daylight And Moon May Make It Difficult To View 'Shooting Stars'

Draconid Meteor Shower

First Posted: 10/07/11 08:22 PM ET Updated: 12/07/11 05:12 AM ET

There's good news and bad news this weekend for stargazers.

The good news is that the Draconid meteor shower is back. It only occurs every six-and-a-half years, and this year some estimates suggest it could bring as many as 750 - 1,000 meteors per hour.

The bad news is that we might not be able to see it.

For those in the United States, the Draconid's timing will be the issue: According to the Associated Press, daylight will prevent us from seeing the the meteor shower, as the peak is predicted to be between 2 and 5 p.m. EDT.

"The timing of the shower favors observers in the Middle East, north Africa and parts of Europe," Bill Cooke, who's with NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, said in a statement.

But even people watching the sky in those parts of the world might not be so fortunate. Fox News reports that the moon, which will be close to full, may decrease the visibility of the meteors.

"The moon sucks," Cooke told the Associated Press. "It's messed up meteor showers this year. Next year will be better."

From The Associated Press:

Because the Draconids move relatively slowly – 12 miles per second – they're faint and the moonlight "really tends to wash them out," Cooke said in a phone interview.

Discovery News' Mark Thompson explains why people on Earth get to see the Draconid meteor shower:

Every six years, Comet Giacobini-Zinner completes an orbit of the sun leaving behind a trail of cometary debris. The Earth passes by Giacobini-Zinner's orbit every October and when it does, we experience gentle increase in the number of meteors flashing through the atmosphere.

This year, NASA says, the Earth is heading straight for three or four of these trails of debris, or "filaments," left in Comet Giacobini-Zinner's wake.

According to one expert, there could be as many as 1,000 meteors per hour. But this year isn't even close to the best. NASA says meteor showers in 1933 and 1946 produced more than 10,000 Draconids per hour. 1985, 1998 and 2005 were also big years.

And while many of us won't be able to see the Draconid meteor shower, one group of California students will get an amazing view (albeit when they eventually recover the cameras from a balloon.)

Want to see an unmatched view of a meteor shower? Astronaut Ron Garan tweeted this amazing picture of a meteor during the Perseids meteor shower in August.

Check out some cool meteor shower pictures below:

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  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. (Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. AFP PHOTO/ JORGE GUERRERO. (Photo credit should read Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Perseids meteor shower is seen in the sky in the early hours of August 12, 2008 near the town of Sofia. The night between 12 August and 13 August is expected to be the peak of the Perseids meteor shower over the eastern sky, a meteor shower which comes every year, beginning in late July and stretching into August. AFP PHOTO / BORYANA KATSAROVA (Photo credit should read BORYANA KATSAROVA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. AFP PHOTO/ JORGE GUERRERO. (Photo credit should read Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor (L) from the Geminids meteor shower enters the Earth's atmosphere past the stars Castor and Pollux (two bright stars, R) on December 12, 2009 above Southold, New York. This meteor shower gets the name 'Geminids' because it appears to radiate from the constellation Gemini. Geminids are pieces of debris from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon. Earth runs into a stream of debris from the object every year in mid-December, causing the meteors. The peak of the shower is expected the night of December 13-14 at about 0500 GMT on December 14. AFP PHOTO/Stan Honda (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor from the Geminids meteor shower (streak at top) enters the Earth's atmosphere on December 12, 2009 above Southold, New York. This meteor shower gets the name 'Geminids' because it appears to radiate from the constellation Gemini. Geminids are pieces of debris from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon. Earth runs into a stream of debris from the object every year in mid-December, causing the meteors. The peak of the shower is expected the night of December 13-14 at about 0500 GMT on December 14. AFP PHOTO/Stan Honda (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • In this Dec. 2009 picture provided by Wally Pacholka of AstroPics.com, a Geminid fireball explodes over the Mojave Desert in the Jojave Desert, Calif. on Dec. 13, 2009. In mid-December 2010, the Geminid meteor shower will make its annual appearance, just in time for Christmas. Astronomers consider it the best meteor shower of 2010, with more than 100 meteors streaking through the night sky every hour. (AP Photo/AstroPics.com, Wally Pacholka) MANDATORY CREDIT: ASTROPICS.COM, WALLY PACHOLKA; NO SALES; EDITORIAL USE ONLY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE 2010 GEMINID METEOR SHOWER STORIES

  • A meteor is seen sparking along the Milky Way while entering the earth's atmosphere, during the Perseid meteor shower early Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, in this long exposure picture taken on a mountain road just south of Macedonia's capital Skopje. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

  • A couple of stargazers observe as a meteor, center, sparks while entering the earth's atmosphere, during the Perseid meteor shower early Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, in this long exposure picture taken from a mountain just south of Macedonia's capital Skopje. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

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Filed by Timothy Stenovec  |