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Anti-Aging Solutions: How Far Would You Go?

First Posted: 10/13/11 09:10 AM ET   Updated: 12/13/11 05:12 AM ET

It seems mankind will forever be fixated upon eternal youth. We've read of legendary quests to find the Fountain of Youth and promises of the elixir of life. Even as a young boy, Peter Pan was determined to never grow up.

While the same desire for youth remains, the means have changed. With today's rapid pace of scientific discovery and technological advancement, it was only a matter of time before the cosmetic industry's anti-aging campaign took a scientific spin in looking for new ways to turn back the clock, or more ambitiously, stop it all together. Rather than focus on the surface value of creams and hiding those wrinkles, scientists have been looking inward at the cellular level and stopping them from forming in the first place.

If going under the knife has become too obvious and googling old wives' remedies has grown too mundane, take a look at the latest anti-aging solutions, as noted by Independent Woman.

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  • Human Growth Hormone

    Following in the footsteps of a few celebrities, many have taken to self-injecting human growth hormones as means to wind back the clock. Though, some of the <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Health/hgh-human-growth-hormone-injections-give-couple-energy/story?id=14260228" target="_hplink">potential side effects </a> may not outweigh the potential benefits.

  • Guangxi

    The province of Guangxi in China reportedly has one of the highest concentrations of people who are aged 100 years and older. Even 125-year-old Luo Meizhen, China's former "Country's Oldest Person" called Gaungxi home. The Guangxi secret? Some think a tradition of the province, drinking bitter wines made from poisonous snakes, may have something to do with it. Cheers.

  • Resveratrol

    If you prefer red wine over wines of the poisonous snake variety, Resveratrol may be more up your alley. While early studies on worm and mice showed promise in the red wine chemical's potential to regulate cell metabolism and eventually extend lifespan, more recent studies by geneticists and gerontologists have yet to see the same results in humans. Vermin: 1, Humans: 0

  • TA-65

    For all it's scientific sounding nomenclature, this proven telomerase activator is a naturally occuring single molecule found in the ancient Chinese herb Astraglus. In lengthening your ever-shortening telomeres, TA-65 promises to slow aging. However, capsules were more effectively tested on man's best friend, rather than man himself.

  • Shivambu

    Shivambu, or "Self-Urine Therapy" for those of us yet to unleash kunhalini up to our third eye, is an Eastern practice that for over 5,000 has been <em>the</em> elixir of life. Urine therapists are happy to speak to the subtle science behind the practice describing it as an extension of the methods of Pasteur. The good news? All it involves is drinking your own urine, so it is quite cost effective. The bad news? All it involves is drinking your own urine.

  • Become A Naked Mole Rat

    The naked mole rat is the latest organism <a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/naked-mole-rat-genome-may-point-way-to-long-healthy-life/2011/10/12/gIQAzGIwfL_story.html?tid=sm_twitter_washingtonpost&tid=sm_twitter_washingtonpost" target="_hplink">to have its entire DNA sequence </a>transcribed. In addition to their freakish ability to painlessly inhale ammonia, naked mole rats have a molecular anticancer mechanism and can live for more than 25 years (compared to the measly 4 years mice experience), oddities that have scientists in a frenzy. Terrible eyesight, poor body temperature regulation and those life-long wrinkles seem a fair payoff for extreme longevity and apparent resistance to ever developing cancer.

  • Cryogenics

    Why stave off the effects of time when you can stop time all together? Rather than test your gag-reflexes and endure shots to the face, you can take the ultimate leap of faith and literally freeze time, giving today's scientists and those of the future a larger time window in figuring out how to conquer what for now seems like the inevitable aging process.

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Filed by Erica Smith  |