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Top Post50 Blogs To Bookmark

Posted: 11/11/11 07:53 AM ET

Now that you've friended your kids on Facebook and joined the Twitter-revolution, it's time to up the ante and tackle the vast territory where "web" meets "log" to spurn the ubiquitous "blog."

According to BlogPulse, there were already more than 156 million public blogs in existence just two months into 2011. Considering we're at the close of the year, you've got your work cut out for you. In an effort to help you navigate the ever-expanding blogosphere, we've compiled a list of eight Huff/Post50-approved blogs to bookmark, (each complete with Twitter accounts to help bulk up your 'Timeline' stream). Happy surfing!

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  • Advanced Style

    When you get tired of The Sartorialist, head over to <a href="http://advancedstyle.blogspot.com/" target="_hplink">Advanced Style</a>. Armed with a camera, New Yorker Ari Seth Cohen has set out to document "proof from the wise and silver haired set that personal style advances with age". Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/AriSethCohen" target="_hplink">@AriSethCohen</a>

  • The New Old Age

    Headed by Paula Span and nestled within the New York Times, <a href="http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/" target="_hplink">The New Old Age </a>explores the challenges boomers face as the 'sandwich generation'. Span and other contributors keep readers up to date with special reports on a variety of health issues and provide helpful resources for Post50s caring for their aging parents. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/TheNewOldAge" target="_hplink">@TheNewOldAge</a>

  • The Good Men Project

    Founded by Tom Matlack, a former venture capitalist turned writer,<a href="http://www.GoodMenProject.com/" target="_hplink"> The Good Men Project</a> is encouraging a national discussion around the question "What does it mean to be a good man?" A variety of voices, (fathers, sons, husbands, and friends) chime in and drive dialogue through first-person narratives. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/goodmenproject" target="_hplink">@GoodMenProject</a>

  • Middle Mojo

    At<a href="http://middlemojo.com" target="_hplink"> Middle Mojo</a>, Joan Anderman has created a space to talk about "what happens when creative people get older and older people get creative". Anderman explores the relationship between creativity and aging through interviews with artists and scientists and with an eye on our changing cultural values and attitudes. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/middlemojo" target="_hplink">@middlemojo</a>

  • Laid-Off Dad

    <a href="http://laidoffdad.typepad.com/lod/" target="_hplink">Laid-Off Dad</a> is the personal blog of Doug French, a writer and single dad who has been laid off three times in a row. Here, French's online musings reach a wide relatable audience, as does his co-blog about co-parenting after divorce, "The Flames Go Up". Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/LOD" target="_hplink">@LOD</a>

  • AARP Blog

    <a href="http://blog.aarp.org/" target="_hplink">AARP's blog</a> is extremely comprehensive, featuring various categories ranging from "entertainment" and "relationships" to "money & savings" and "volunteering", offering readers a healthy mix that remains organized. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/AARP" target="_hplink">@AARP</a>

  • Midlife Bloggers

    If you consider yourself to be in the middle of your life, and want a break from 'how to's' and lectures, <a href="http://midlifebloggers.com" target="_hplink">Midlife Bloggers</a> merits a bookmark. Here, Jane Gassner, the founder and editor, has rounded up real voices from everyday individuals who share their experiences of middle life. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/MidLifeBloggers" target="_hplink">@MidLifeBloggers</a>

  • TED Blog

    The <a href="http://blog.ted.com/" target="_hplink">TED Blog</a> gives you instant access to "ideas worth spreading" as discussed through the popular global conferences on technology, research, design and culture. Since presenters are given a maximum of 18 minutes, TED talks can fit into your busy schedule. Twitter: <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/TEDTalks" target="_hplink">@tedtalks</a>

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Filed by Erica Smith  |