DENVER
12/29/2011 01:01 pm ET | Updated Dec 29, 2011

In-N-Out Coming To Denver? Councilman Albus Brooks Is Working On It

For burger lovers, Southern California-based In-N-Out Burger is nothing short of sacred. Their "fresh-never-frozen" style has made them a legend that has spread the family owned burger chain from its California roots into Utah, Nevada, Arizona and Texas, so why not Colorado? Denver City Councilman for District 8 and California transplant Albus Brooks is working on just that, according to a couple of recent Facebook posts. On Tuesday, Brooks wrote on his wall:

Had a great conversation with folks tied to in-n-out execs. How hungry are y'all to have them come to Denver?

Then after getting dozens of likes, posts and comments about the possibility of In-N-Out coming to Mile High City, he wrote this on Facebook:

Getting a little bit of buzz from this story. It is my goal to support local businesses while also attracting investment from responsible businesses. I'm looking for win-wins. Glad this started a bigger conversation... What other businesses would you like to see come to District 8?

To which an overwhelming amount of people posted "Trader Joes" -- another California chain that has been forever-rumored to be coming to Colorado. But, perhaps In-N-Out and Trader Joes will eventually land in Colorado, following the recent successful arrivals of IKEA and H&M.

With regard to In-N-Out, Brooks said that he supports buying locally and doesn't intend to take away from local burger restaurants in Denver, 9News reports.

Brooks told Kurtis Lee at The Denver Post that a member of his family has ties to the CFO of In-N-Out and that having the company look into setting up shop in Denver will be a part of his agenda in 2012.

Fox31 notes that In-N-Out is not just famous for burgers, but also for their inclusion of bible verse notations on the bottom of their soda cups and some food wrappers. In-N-Out's nearly 300 restaurants are still owned by the Snyders, the family that founded the burger joint in the 1940s and according to CNN, the Snyders are a religious family and since they continue to control the restaurant chain they can print whatever it is they like on the food wrappers.

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