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New Hampshire Exit Polls 2012: When Will A Winner Be Predicted? [UPDATE]

New Hampshire Exit Polls 2012

The Huffington Post   First Posted: 01/10/2012 7:00 pm Updated: 01/10/2012 7:15 pm

The votes may not all be tallied yet in the New Hampshire Republican primary, but the exit polls are expected to point toward a potential victor: Mitt Romney.

The former Massachusetts governor, who endured a bit of a beating leading up to the Granite State's primary election, is not the official winner yet, but these polls do give a pretty clear hint about the primary's ultimate outcome. Romney, who at points held as much as a 20-percent lead over the rest of the GOP field in New Hampshire, should come through with a substantial margin.

According to Fox News Romney was leading among both undecided primary voters (holding a lead of about 1 percent) and late voters (holding a lead of about 5 percent). Among undecided voters, Ron Paul was running a close second, with 29 percent of the potential vote.

Jon Huntsman, who was hoping to get a real boost from the contest in New Hampshire, trails among late voters, but his overall future remains uncertain. According to Fox News, political analysts say that Romney really need a solid margin, about 37 percent of the vote, to walk away satisfied.

Fox News will be streaming in recent exit poll data here, as it comes in.

Other outlets however, are already reporting results. While the tiny districts of Dixville Notch and Hart's Location voted last night and have already reported results, other counties have just begun reporting as the polls close.

CNN and CBS will be reporting results live, as will The Huffington Post. Be sure to check out our interactive map of live results here.

UPDATE: CNN is now reporting more exit poll data, with some interesting results. Though Romney seems to have taken a large portion of the vote and has been projected as the winner, Ron Paul, who will likely finish second, succeeded in some interesting demographics. Among Paul's strengths were the 18-29 age range as well as popularity among unmarried and lower-income voters.

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