Huffpost Politics

Mitt Romney And Ron Paul Skipping Election Night Rallies, Rick Santorum In Louisiana

Posted: Updated:

There are several possible outcomes once the results of primaries in Mississippi and Alabama start to roll in on Tuesday night. Over at National Review, Robert Costa has a good run down of what to look for.

But in keeping with the somewhat unpredictable nature of the evening, each of the Republican candidates is approaching the usually predictable election night rally a little differently.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who actually has a shot at winning one or both primaries but is especially competitive in Mississippi, is not having a rally at all. That's a first for Romney on a big primary day, and is in keeping with his efforts to set himself up as the underdog in the Southern states. If he wins either state, it seems likely he would make some sort of public statement to TV cameras.

Former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Pa.) is holding a rally, but not in either of the primary states. He'll be in Lafayette, La. It's something of an odd choice, since Louisiana doesn't hold its primary until March 24. Between now and then, Missouri will hold a caucus on Saturday, March 17, and Illinois will have its primary on Tuesday, March 20.

For Santorum, going to Louisiana is an attempt to project resolve and staying power in the race. But it's not where he should be, or no doubt would like to be. He'd much prefer to be in Mississippi or Alabama, claiming a win. But polls have indicated that he is likely to lose both states. This is a serious blow to his chances of becoming the candidate that conservatives who don't want Romney unite behind.

Romney, by the way, is campaigning in Missouri on Tuesday.

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) will be in Birmingham, Ala. Gingrich badly needs to win one of the two primaries, though if he beats Santorum and comes in second to Romney he will have a rebuttal to the idea that he should get out of the race. Gingrich apparently thinks he has a better shot of winning in Alabama than in Mississippi.

Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas), like Romney, does not have any rally planned. That's because he is hoping for his best result in a totally separate contest -- the caucuses in Hawaii that are also taking place Tuesday.

"Our focus today is Hawaii and the returns will come in so late," Jesse Benton, Paul's national campaign chairman, told The Huffington Post.

Paul will campaign in Illinois on Wednesday and in Missouri on Thursday.

Around the Web

Romney's reality in Mississippi and Alabama

On day of Deep South primaries, Romney goes to Missouri

Voting in Alabama, Mississippi could clarify race

Mississippi Gov. Bryant endorses Romney

Romney and the Mormon factor

TRENDING: Romney in Mississippi: 'I like grits'

Mississippi Whites Not Used to Help Back Republican Aid Cutters

 
  Obama Romney
Obama Romney
332 206
Obama leading
Obama won
Romney leading
Romney won
Popular Vote
33 out of 100 seats are up for election. 51 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Holdover
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats* Republicans
Current Senate 53 47
Seats gained or lost +2 -2
New Total 55 45
* Includes two independent senators expected to caucus with the Democrats: Angus King (Maine) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.).
All 435 seats are up for election. 218 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats Republicans
Seats won 201 234
Click for Full Results
Register To Vote