Huffpost Politics

Dan Dolan, Iowa GOP Candidate, Accidentally Gives Speech At Democratic Convention

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Who says Republicans and Democrats can’t be in the same room together?

That is exactly what happened on Saturday when Republican congressional candidate Dan Dolan of Muscatine, Iowa arrived at the Monroe County Courthouse in Albia, Iowa to speak at the Republican convention being held there.

The Democrats were also holding their county convention at the same building that day, however. After a staffer notified the venue that Dolan had arrived, he was whisked onstage to give his speech.

"Nobody asked enough questions before he started speaking," Monroe County supervisor Denny Ryan told the Quad-City Times. “It finally got to the point in the speech where one of the people said, ‘Are you sure you’re at the right convention?’”

According to the Quad-City Times Dolan took the gaffe very well, and even laughed when asked to describe the incident.

“It was a crazy day,” Dolan said. “We had scheduled 10 speaking engagements through the district.”

"My staffer runs up and says, ‘Hey, Dan Dolan is here. Can he speak?’ So they stopped everything, and I get up there and give my speech,” he said. “I get done, a guy raises his hand and says, ‘I think you want to talk to the Republicans.’”

The Democratic convention was scheduled to begin at 11 a.m., with the Republican convention later that afternoon, at 1 p.m. Dolan had arrived early for the Republican event, contributing to the mixup.

Dolan and his campaign staff made sure not to make the same mistake a second time, however.

“From that point on, we checked at every place we stopped,” Dolan said. “We said, ‘Is this the Republican convention?’”

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