April Fools' Day isn't just for April 1. That's the takeaway from the news that James Cameron was possibly interested in directing a sequel to "Prometheus" -- which would be fantastic if it didn't start as an April Fools' Day prank.

Multiple sites picked up the news that Cameron had discussed directing a follow-up to Ridley Scott's "Prometheus" during the red carpet premiere of "Titanic" last week. "It was during those early talks when he brought up the idea of me stepping in to direct a follow-up," Cameron was quoted as saying by the website Worst Previews. "This is why there's a gap of a few years between 'Prometheus' and the original 'Alien.' That gap is meant for me to answer all the questions raised in 'Prometheus.'"

Cameron directed "Aliens," the 1986 sequel to Scott's "Alien."

Unfortunately for fans, those quotes were likely fabricated or taken out of context -- the source at the bottom of the Worst Previews article links to an April Fools' Day photo.

According to Deadline.com, Cameron's reps said the director was kidding about the "Prometheus" sequel, as he's too focused on the "Avatar" sequels to actually undertake the project.

In other Hollywood news!

· If you saw "The Woman In Black," you'll understand why the sequel will take place 40 years in the future. The period horror thriller, with "Harry Potter" star Daniel Radcliffe in the lead role, was released in February and earned $112 million worldwide.

· So you're saying there's a chance! Speaking with Coming Soon over the weekend, Peter Farrelly revealed that "Dumb & Dumber 2" will begin shooting in September. Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels will return to star.

· According to Marvel head Kevin Feige, an adaptation of "Ant-Man" is closer than ever. Edgar Wright ("Scott Pilgrim Vs. the World") would direct.

PHOTOS: James Cameron Completes Mariana Trench Dive

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  • This February 2012 file photo provided by National Geographic, shows explorer and filmmaker James Cameron emerging from the hatch of DEEPSEA CHALLENGER during testing of the submersible in Jervis Bay, south of Sydney, Australia. Cameron on Sunday, March 25, 2012 began his journey to someplace only two men have gone before �-- to the Earth's deepest point. The director of "Titanic," ''Avatar" and other films is using the specially designed submarine to descend nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, an area 200 miles (320 kilometers) southwest of the Pacific island of Guam. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen, File)

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron gets a handshake from ocean explorer and U.S. Navy Capt. Don Walsh, right, just before the hatch on the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible is closed and the voyage to the deepest part of the ocean begins, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron is the first person to complete the dive solo. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible carrying filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is hoisted into the Pacific Ocean on its way to the "Challenger Deep," the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, Sunday, March 25, 2012. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • This February 2012 handout photo provided by National Geographic shows the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible begining its first test dive off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Earth's lost frontier, the deepest part of the oceans where the pressure is like three SUVs sitting on your little tow, is about to be explored first-hand. It's been more than half a century since man dared to plunge that deep. Earth's lost frontier is about to be explored firsthand after more than half a century. It's a mission to the deepest part of the ocean, so deep that the pressure is the equivalent of three SUVs sitting on your toe. And it's being launched by the rich and famous. In the next several days, James Cameron, the director of �"Titanic,�" �"Avatar�" and �"The Abyss,�" plans to dive nearly 7 miles deep in a one-man sub he helped design. The location is the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific. �"It's the last frontier for science and exploration on this planet,�" Cameron said. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, National Geographic)

  • In an image provided by National Geographic filmmaker James Cameron gives two thumbs-up as he emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible Monday March 26, 2012 after his successful solo dive in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

  • Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible after his successful solo dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, Monday March 26, 2011. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic) ONE TIME USE

  • In a photo provided by National Geographic filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron holds the National Geographic Society flag after he successfully completed the first ever solo dive to the Mariana Trench Monday March 26, 2012. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)


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