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'Kony 2012' Sequel: Invisible Children Releases Kony 2012: Part II - Beyond Famous' (VIDEO)

Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 04/ 5/2012 11:16 am Updated: 04/ 5/2012 5:41 pm

Kony Sequel

Invisible Children has released a sequel to its "Kony 2012" film after more than 100 million viewers helped make the Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony infamous worldwide.

The new film "Kony 2012: Part II - Beyond Famous" released Thursday comes in the wake of worldwide criticism that the original video simplified complex issues related to the years of conflict in Uganda. The sequel aims to provide a more in-depth look at Kony's Lord's Resistance Army, which turns children into soldiers and slaves as a means to destabilize the government.

In the video, Invisible Children offers what it calls a "comprehensive approach" to stopping Kony, which includes civilian protection, urging peaceful surrender, providing rehabilitation centers in post-conflict areas and arresting Kony.

"Kony 2012: Part II - Beyond Famous" delves deeper into the fact that traditional peace talks by political and religious leaders have not been able to stop Kony.

"The lesson learned is they commit crimes again," says Luis Moreno-Ocampo, chief international criminal court prosecutor, in the film. "Kony [at] different times proposed peace and then just regained strength and attacked. These guys are committing crimes as a normal way to get power."

Invisible Children co-founder Jason Russell, who suffered a highly public mental breakdown on the streets of San Diego, does not play a part in the film.

As was the case with the original film, the sequel urges viewers to take action and contact policymakers. In the U.S., two bipartisan resolutions supporting the efforts to disarm the LRA were introduced and have now been sponsored by 92 members of Congress, according to the video. And on March 23, the African Union announced the establishment of a Regional Cooperation Initiative to coordinate efforts to end LRA violence in Central Africa.

The second video reminds viewers to heed the call to action on April 20 for the "Cover the Night" movement. Supporters will have the opportunity to show a unified front by serving local communities and contacting policymakers.

"We are a new generation of justice made for such a time as this, because our liberty is bound together across the world and across the street," says the narrator in the video.

Learn more about what you can do through Cover the Night here.

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  • Self-proclaimed mystic Kony began one of a series of initially popular uprisings in northern Uganda after President Yoweri Museveni seized power in 1986. But tactics of abducting recruits and killing civilians alienated supporters.

  • The LRA is infamous for kidnapping children for use as soldiers, porters and "wives". Although there are no universally accepted figures, the children are believed to number many thousands. Some are freed after days, others never escape. <br> <em>Trauma counselor Florence Lakor, right, listens to 16-year-old Julius, as he tells of the two years he was forced by the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) to live as a guerrilla fighter in Sudan and Uganda. (AP)</em>

  • Tens of thousands of people have been killed in the 21-year war. A landmark truce was signed in August 2006 and was later renewed. But negotiations brokered by south Sudanese mediators have frequently stalled.

  • The cessation of hostilities has been largely respected, but the guerrilla group has said it will never sign a final peace deal unless the International Criminal Court drops indictments against its leaders for atrocities. <br> <em>Uganda's Interior Minister Ruhakana Rugunda, right, and the head of the government peace talk delegation exchanges documents with the leader of the Lords Resistance Army peace talks delegation Martin Ojul, left, after signing a ceasefire agreement at State House in Kampala, Uganda, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2007. (AP)</em>

  • Kony's force was once supported by the Khartoum government as a proxy militia, although Sudan says it has now cut ties with the LRA. Kony left his hideouts in south Sudan in 2005 for the Democratic Republic of Congo's remote Garamba forest. <br> <em>Map shows areas in Africa where the Lord's Resistance Army has had a known presence in the past year. (AP)</em>

  • Many northerners revile Kony for his group's atrocities, but also blame Museveni for setting up camps for nearly 2 million people as part of his counter-insurgency strategy, fuelling one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. <br> <em>Internally displaced people line up to receive food provided by the World Food Programe, Thursday, June 15, 2006 at the Pabbo camp outside Gulu, northern Uganda. (AP)</em>

  • Kony has said he is fighting to defend the Biblical Ten Commandments, although his group has also articulated a range of northern grievances, from the looting of cattle by Museveni's troops to demands for a greater share of political power. <br> <em>Joseph Kony, leader of Uganda's Lord's Resistance Army, second right, and his deputy Vincent Otti, right, are seen during a meeting with a delegation of Ugandan officials and lawmakers and representatives from non-governmental organizations, Monday, July 31, 2006 in the Democratic Republic of Congo near the Sudanese border. (AP)</em>

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