iOS app Android app More

Brenda Salveson Stumbles Upon Meteorite Worth $20,000 In Local California Park

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 05/03/2012 10:31 am Updated: 05/04/2012 11:13 am

Salveson Meteorite
Brenda Salveson reenacts her rare find for local television.

A stay-at-home mom from the aptly named El Dorado County in California recently stumbled on something far more precious than gold.

Brenda Salveson found a meteorite potentially worth $20,000 in a local park where she brings her kids and dog, a local TV station in Sacramento reports.

“I was lucky, blessed, good karma,” Salveson told CBS Local. “It was sitting there at my toes like an Easter egg.”

The rock is one of many meteorites that fell from outer space, peppering Gold Country with primitive space rocks on April 22.

That meteor shower and Salveson's find drew hordes of scientists and treasure-seekers to the neighborhood, reports USA Today. It's a modern day retread of the historic California Gold Rush, which brought fortune hunters to the area in the mid-1800s.

According to CBS, Salveson geologists and scientists confirmed the rock was a rare meteorite. “As I opened my hand, there was a huge gasp,” Salveson said.

After finding the meteorite, Salveson's first stop was her son's elementary school classroom for a little show and tell. Her son, Tommy, told CBS Local it was "a little freaky when I shared it in my class."

Scientists told CBS Local the meteorite could be 4 to 6 billion years old, dating back to the early formation of the solar system. The Los Angeles Times reports that meteorites this rare could be worth up to $1,000 per gram.

Gold was first discovered in California in 1848 at Sutter's Mill, a few miles from Lotus, where Salveson found the treasure.

WATCH: Brenda Salveson finds rare meteorite while walking dog.

GALLERY: PAST METEOR SHOWERS
Loading Slideshow...
  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. (Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. AFP PHOTO/ JORGE GUERRERO. (Photo credit should read Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A Perseids meteor shower is seen in the sky in the early hours of August 12, 2008 near the town of Sofia. The night between 12 August and 13 August is expected to be the peak of the Perseids meteor shower over the eastern sky, a meteor shower which comes every year, beginning in late July and stretching into August. AFP PHOTO / BORYANA KATSAROVA (Photo credit should read BORYANA KATSAROVA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor streaks across the sky against a field of stars during a meteorite shower early August 13, 2010 near Grazalema, southern Spain. AFP PHOTO/ JORGE GUERRERO. (Photo credit should read Jorge Guerrero/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor (L) from the Geminids meteor shower enters the Earth's atmosphere past the stars Castor and Pollux (two bright stars, R) on December 12, 2009 above Southold, New York. This meteor shower gets the name 'Geminids' because it appears to radiate from the constellation Gemini. Geminids are pieces of debris from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon. Earth runs into a stream of debris from the object every year in mid-December, causing the meteors. The peak of the shower is expected the night of December 13-14 at about 0500 GMT on December 14. AFP PHOTO/Stan Honda (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A meteor from the Geminids meteor shower (streak at top) enters the Earth's atmosphere on December 12, 2009 above Southold, New York. This meteor shower gets the name 'Geminids' because it appears to radiate from the constellation Gemini. Geminids are pieces of debris from an asteroid called 3200 Phaethon. Earth runs into a stream of debris from the object every year in mid-December, causing the meteors. The peak of the shower is expected the night of December 13-14 at about 0500 GMT on December 14. AFP PHOTO/Stan Honda (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)

  • In this Dec. 2009 picture provided by Wally Pacholka of AstroPics.com, a Geminid fireball explodes over the Mojave Desert in the Jojave Desert, Calif. on Dec. 13, 2009. In mid-December 2010, the Geminid meteor shower will make its annual appearance, just in time for Christmas. Astronomers consider it the best meteor shower of 2010, with more than 100 meteors streaking through the night sky every hour. (AP Photo/AstroPics.com, Wally Pacholka) MANDATORY CREDIT: ASTROPICS.COM, WALLY PACHOLKA; NO SALES; EDITORIAL USE ONLY IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE 2010 GEMINID METEOR SHOWER STORIES

  • A meteor is seen sparking along the Milky Way while entering the earth's atmosphere, during the Perseid meteor shower early Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, in this long exposure picture taken on a mountain road just south of Macedonia's capital Skopje. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

  • A couple of stargazers observe as a meteor, center, sparks while entering the earth's atmosphere, during the Perseid meteor shower early Friday, Aug. 13, 2010, in this long exposure picture taken from a mountain just south of Macedonia's capital Skopje. (AP Photo/Boris Grdanoski)

FOLLOW MONEY