Your morning Starbucks stop is doing more than keeping you awake -- that coffee may be helping you live longer, according to a new study in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Regardless of whether you choose regular or decaf, people who drank coffee were "a little more likely to live longer" than those who didn't, CBS News reports. The study, which tracked the drinking habits of more than 400,000 men and women between the ages of 50-71 from 1995 to 2008, is the largest of its kind. It was performed by the National Institute of Health and AARP.

The study put a point in favor of the caffeinated beverage (though previous studies that note the correlation between coffee and high cholesterol and blood pressure aren't wrong). While there was only a small correlation between coffee and decreased mortality, coffee drinkers did see some standout results, according to CBS News:

Compared with those who drank no coffee, men who had two or three cups a day were 10 percent less likely to die at any age. For women, it was 13 percent.

A single cup a day lowered risk a tiny bit: 6 percent in men and 5 percent in women. The strongest effect was in women who had four or five cups a day — they had a 16 percent lower risk of death.

You can upgrade that Cafe Americano from a Grande to a Venti, or try any of these anti-aging strategies below.

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  • Exercise

    Exercising does more than improve your exterior. Several studies have found <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/27/phys-ed-how-exercising-keeps-your-cells-young/" target="_hplink">an active lifestyle keeps your cells young</a>, according to <em>The New York Times.</em>

  • Eat Carrots, Pumpkin and Squash

    These orange veggies are chock full of the phytonutrient alpha-carotene, which <a href="http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-alpha-carotene-112310,0,2855017.story" target="_hplink">lowered the risk of dying from cancer and cardiovascular diseases</a> in a study, according to <em>The Los Angeles Times</em>.

  • Avoid Too Much Sun

    Sun worshippers, take heed: Between <a href="http://www.who.int/uv/faq/skincancer/en/index1.html" target="_hplink">two and three million people are diagnosed with skin cancer</a> globally each year, according to the World Health Organization. With May being Skin Cancer Awareness Month, <a href="http://www.thirdage.com/skin/skin-cancer-awareness-month">Third Age has tips on how to avoid the "potentially fatal cancer."</a>

  • Have Sex

    A ring-a-ding-ding! Dr. Braverman of <em>The Doctors</em> suggests <a href="http://www.thedoctorstv.com/main/content/Anti_Aging" target="_hplink">having sex at least two times a week to help "reboot the brain</a>."

  • Take Your Omega-3s

    Studies suggest that foods rich in this fatty acid may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's.

  • The Computer-Exercise Combo

    <em>Huff/Post50</em> recently reported on a study that had subjects <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/05/01/preventing-memory-loss_n_1465789.html?ref=fifty&ir=Fifty&just_reloaded=1">do moderate exercise and use a computer, which resulted in increased memory function</a>.

  • Up Your Glutathione Intake

    <a href="http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/quality-life-concierge/2012/apr/16/glutathione-anti-aging-machine/">Glutathione is a rock-star antioxidant found in the body's cells</a> that "neutralizes harmful free radicals," and keeps cells running smoothly, <a href="http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/glutathione-new-supplement-on-block" target="_hplink">according to WebMD</a>. To attain these benefits, eat a diet loaded with fruits and vegetables.

  • Own A Pet

    While there are conflicting reports on whether or not pets will add years to your life, it is confirmed that <a href="http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/30/rethinking-the-value-of-pets/" target="_hplink">pets can ease stress and lower blood pressure</a>, <em>The New York Times</em> reports.

  • Limit Sugar Intake

    A spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but it also "<a href="http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/02/11437/societal-control-sugar-essential-ease-public-health-burden" target="_hplink">changes metabolism, raises blood pressure, critically alters the signaling of hormones and causes significant damage to the liver</a>," according to three doctors at the University of California at San Francisco. In a <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v482/n7383/full/482027a.html" target="_hplink">recent issue of Nature</a>, they argued that the health hazards of sugar are similar to those related to drinking too much alcohol.