The Central Asian artist Lekim Ibragimov recently completed a mega-painting debuting in July that brings the ambition of the famous collection of folk tales, "One Thousand and One Nights," to canvas. Consisting of 1000 individual paintings of angels spanning 216 feet, the large-scale work has recently been submitted to the Guinness World Records Committee as "the world's largest painting consisting of 1,000 pieces." Proceeds from the project will be donated to children with disabilities.

Ibragimov was born in Kazakhstan and is currently based out of neighboring Uzbekistan. As an accomplished painter and member of the Russian Academy of Arts, Ibragimov has always been fascinated by Asian literature and the compelling history of the silk road. In 2010, he began work on what he calls his "visual epos," creating a nearly 50-foot sketch of what would eventually come to be his 1,001 art project. After 2 1/2 years, he was able to finally put the finishing touches on this 48,500 pound artwork.

Using oil paints and free brush strokes, Ibragimov's style mixes Chinese fresco painting styles with European color-blending techniques. Each individual angel is painted onto its own canvas, amounting to 1,000 individual pieces which were then carefully linked to create one unified entity -- hence the "1,001" suggested in the title. The piece urges the viewer to reflect on the process of turning a collection of independent paintings into a singular viewing experience. Through this ambitious undertaking, the artist heavily emphasizes the social aspect of the painting in order to unite the Eastern and Western worlds; this summer, the work will tour key cities across the world in order to bring his message of peace to a large audience. Ibragimov states on his website, "For me, it is an ancient song that will sound over the cities where my angels will be exhibited."

Ibragimov's paintings will be touring the world this year and will be exhibited in a number of UNESCO World Heritage sites. You can check out the potentially record-breaking piece in Prague from July 9th through the 21st.

And check out images of the 1001 Art Project below!

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  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    Lekim Ibragimov, "One thousand angels and one painting," 2012. Photo courtesy of 1001 Art Project.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    "One thousand angels and one painting" is unique art project launching in Prague on July 9. It is a gigantic painting which is 66 meters long and consists of 1000 single paintings (each depicting an angel) that unite together to form a completely new canvas with its own plot. Each of the 1000 paintings is a separate story written in a picturesque calligraphic manner.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    The artist recently submitted his project to the Guinness World Records as the world's largest painting, which consists of 1000 parts.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    Main Facts: 26 ft. high, 216 ft. long. Weight: 48500 lb. Area: 5700 sf. 1.5 ml. of steel cable. Four days for installation.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    The project will be exhibited in different parts of the world with only one purpose -- to give people hope and joy. Lekim Ibragimov believes that among thousands of angels on the paintings everyone will be able to find his or her own guardian angel.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    All the money gained from the sponsorship of the project is granted to children with disabilities residing in the cities where the painting is exhibited.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    "My main source of inspiration is the ancient art of the East, but I am also searching for it in the contemporary European art," Lekim Ibragimov wrote to HuffPost Arts.

  • One Thousand Angels and One Painting by Lekim Ibragimov

    Lekim Ibragimov is an artist based in Central Asian who is known for his combination of Oriental miniatures and adherence to traditions in European painting.

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