We already know that Season 2 of "American Horror Story" will include some familiar faces from Season 1, but they will not be in the same place, at the same time, or playing the same characters.

Creator Ryan Murphy previously revealed that the sophomore season of the divisive FX series will be set in an insane asylum. But in a recent interview with Vulture, in which he discussed everything from his personal life to his other series "Glee" and next season's NBC comedy "The New Normal," Murphy spilled some more details about Season 2.

"The new season is set in the 1960s and Chloe Sevigny, for example, plays a character who was put in an asylum because she was a woman who likes sex," Murphy told Vulture in the in-depth interview. "At the time, you were able to put people away for that. Another character is institutionalized for being a lesbian. To me, there’s nothing more scary than somebody coming to you and saying they’re going to take you away and put you in a mad house and you have no legal rights and there you shall stay till the end of your days. That is a real horror."

Though there were no further details Season 2 star Jessica Lange, Murphy did reveal that Evan Peters, who played "ultimate badass bad boy" Tate Langdon, will be "the hero of the show" in Season 2. "It’s not like the actors are playing similar parts. They’re going to look different, they’re going to sound different, they’re going to have different accents," Murphy explained to Vulture. "It’s a different time period. The actors are so excited to do that and hopefully their enthusiasm will translate."

In addition to Lange and Peters, Season 1 stars Zachary Quinto, Lily Rabe and Sarah Paulson will be back for Season 2. Sevigny, Maroon 5 frontman Adam Levine and James Cromwell will also join the "American Horror Story" cast for Season 2. A relatively unknown French actress named Lizzie Brocheré will be playing a femme fatale named Gia.

And although Season 2 hasn't even started yet, Murphy is thinking ahead. "I even know what the third season would be," he said. "There are very, very many different kinds of haunted houses in our culture."

For additional details from Ryan Murphy on "American Horror Story," "Glee," "The New Normal" and more, click over to Vulture.

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