Is arranged marriage a stifling, outdated practice or is it just a more family-oriented way of finding love?

On Wednesday, CNN examined the pros and cons of arranged marriages, which, according to UNICEF, make up 90 percent of marriages in India.

Proponents of arranged marriage say that there are many benefits to the practice. Often, couples who have their marriages arranged by their families have similar religious, financial and social backgrounds, which research has shown are important factors in lasting relationships.

Although many still see the age-old practice as "forced" marriage, some modern Indian couples are speaking out against the stigma surrounding the tradition, even saying that romance actually lasts longer in arranged marriages than in "love" marriages.

CNN reporter Sumnima Udas spoke to married couple Priyanka and Aditya Anand, who met only twice before they agreed to be wed in an arranged marriage. Priyanka, an MBA student, told CNN that she grew up knowing that she had to be open to the idea of arranged marriage. "It happens in our culture," she said. "It works out."

According to a recent survey, 65 percent of Indian students believed the final decision on marriage should still be made by their parents. "Today, parents do give you an option to meet the person to see if you do get along with them. It's not forced anymore," said Priyanka.

But that's not the case for all marriages. CNN also talked to child bride Meena who was forced to marry at the age of 14, against her wishes. Meena's marriage quickly became a nightmare -- with her husband and in-laws beating her regularly.

"I never knew marriage could be like hell," said Meena.

Watch the video above to learn more about arranged marriages in India.