For a project entitled "Beautiful Traps," tech-savvy artist Yiying Lu painted dazzling and dangerous carnivorous plants with QR codes. Seven predatory plants get a QR makeover: Rafflesia Arnoldii (the largest flower in the world), Drosera (aka "Sundew"), Amorphophallus (aka "Voodoo Lily"), Sarracenia Leucophylla (white pitcher plant), Nepenthes Truncata (tropical pitcher plant), Nepenthes Rafflesiana, and the infamous Dionaea Muscipula, better known as the Venus Flytrap.

Although we don't usually associate data coding with plant life, the combination works through Lu's expert time-lapse video (shown above). As you can see, the codes are not just decorative. When scanned, they show a world of gorgeous models posing with enticing, deadly hats. Rarely do nature and technology interact in such an unexpected and delightful way, and through this project, Yu shows us that art and technology can go hand-in-hand to create incredible images.

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