Huffpost WorldPost

@Sweden Twitter Account Stirs Controversy

Posted: Updated:
Print Article

A twitter experiment in Sweden has taken a wrong turn. The public @sweden twitter account created quite a stir on Tuesday as its curator sent out tweets that many interpreted as being anti-semitic.


@sweden / Sonja
Whats the fuzz with jews. You can't even see if a person is a jew, unless you see their penises, and even if you do, you can't be sure!?

@sweden / Sonja
In nazi German they even had to sew stars on their sleeves. If they didn't, they could never now who was a jew and who was not a jew.

In a later tweet Sonja Abraham, the current curator of the account, apologized for the messages, saying "I'm sorry if some of you find the question offensive. Thats was not my purpose. I just don't get why some people hates jews so much."

@sweden is part of the Curators of Sweden project, which allows ordinary Swedes to tweet from the nation's official account about, well, whatever they want.

Mashable reports the project was meant to promote Sweden as a tourist destination. Thomas Brühl, CEO of VisitSweden, told the site at the launch of the program: “No one owns the brand of Sweden more than its people. With this initiative we let them show their Sweden to the world.”

In a recent article on the experiment, the New York Times explains curatorship of the account changes every 7 days. Participants can't nominate themselves and are selected by a panel. Cherin Awa, a Muslim lawyer who was @Sweden from Feb. 27 to March 4 told the Times tweeps are told "not to do anything criminal, political opinions as their own and “not to make it sound like the entire Sweden feels that way.”

Seems like this person misunderstood.

Also on The Huffington Post

Sweden's Twitter Fail
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

@sweden / Sonja (sweden) on Twitter

Many Voices of Sweden, via Twitter - NYTimes.com

Sweden's Official Twitter Account Is Off the Rails -- Daily Intel

Curators of Sweden - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia