WASHINGTON, June 14 (Reuters) - The United States expects Egypt's military authorities to fully transfer power to a democratically elected civilian government as planned, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Thursday.

"There can be no going back on the democratic transition called for by the Egyptian people," Clinton told reporters, declining specific comment on an Egyptian court ruling to dissolve the country's newly elected Islamist-led parliament.

Egypt's supreme court ruling plunged a troubled transition to democracy into turmoil just two days before an election to replace ousted leader Hosni Mubarak.

Islamist politicians who had gained most from Mubarak's overthrow have decried what they called a "coup" by an army-led establishment still filled with Mubarak-era officials.

"Throughout this process, the United States has stood in support of the aspirations of the Egyptian people for a peaceful, credible and permanent democratic transition," Clinton said at a news conference of the U.S. and South Korean foreign and defense ministers.

"Now, ultimately it is up to the Egyptian people to determine their own future and we expect that this weekend's presidential election will be held in an atmosphere that is conducive to it being peaceful, fair and free," she added.

"In keeping with the commitments that the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces made to the Egyptian people, we expect to see a full transfer of power to a democratically elected civilian government," she said.

"The decisions on specific issues, of course, belong to the Egyptian people and their elected leaders, and they've made it clear that they want a president, a parliament and a constitutional order that will reflect their will and advance their aspirations for political and economic reform," Clinton said. "That is exactly what they deserve to have."

Clinton also voiced concern about a decree issued by the military council on Wednesday allowing the military police and intelligence service to detain civilians and refer them to military tribunals.

"We are concerned about recent decrees issued by the SCAF," she said. "Even if they are temporary, they appear to expand the power of the military to detain civilians and to roll back civil liberties." (Reporting By Arshad Mohammed; Editing by Jackie Frank and David Brunnstrom)

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  • An Egyptian boy peers out of barbed wire, his face painted with the number 25, the date of the Egyptian revolution, during a protest in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • Egyptian protesters hold a defaced poster of presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq as they face soldiers in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • An Egyptian holds a shoe covered with a defaced picture of Egyptian presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq and Arabic that reads "feloul," an Egyptian expression that describes the remains of the regime, during a protest in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court, Egypt's highest court, in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • An Egyptian protester wears tape over his mouth reading, "no arrest rights," and holds a defaced picture of presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq during a protest in front the Supreme Constitutional Court, in Cairo, Egypt Thursday, June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)

  • Egyptians shout anti-military slogans during a protest in front of soldiers standing guard in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • Egyptian protesters point at soldiers in front of the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, June 14, 2012. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

  • Egyptian protesters set a portrait of former premier and presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq on fire during a demonstration outside the Supreme Consitutional Court in central Cairo on June 14, 2012. (MARWAN NAAMANI/AFP/GettyImages)