Huffpost Arts

Alexander Koshelkov's Disturbing Time-Lapse Photoshop Video 'Luftbanza Airlines' Goes Viral (VIDEO)

Posted: Updated:

Watching the first minute of Alexander Koshelkov's latest time-lapse art video on Youtube is like listening to the audio track from "Jurassic Park" while scenes from a violent video game flash before your eyes at seizure-inducing speeds. Titled "Luftbanza Airlines," the excruciatingly painful time lapse video is a recording of the graphic artist photoshopping together a fictional plane crash. As you can imagine, it's been hot on Reddit.

Here's a recap of the video if you'd rather read the awful details than risk the sanctity of your eyes and ears:

The images of the photoshopping process flash on your monitor like a virus-ridden laptop when you've tried to switch between screens too many times. It took 244 Photoshop layers to create this assemblage of terror; the accompanying soundtrack seems like it was ripped straight from some apocalyptic thriller. It's a loud and irritating combination of operatic singing, electronic crescendos and pulsating drums that sound like helicopter propellers. Every once in a while the drones are interrupted by creepy piano solos, but just when you think the ear-assaulting music has subsided, in come the strings and dissonant brass noises and your catapulted right back into a robot fight scene from "Transformers."

The best/most disturbing part of the video is when Koshelkov starts inserting fleeing people into the crash scene. A photo of what looks like someone's dad happily running in a backyard flashes across the screen before that dad is clipped out and inserted into the ruinous disaster. Ultimately, watching Koshelkov's time-lapse video is like watching a really morbid puzzle being assembled. After all the people, vehicles and trees are copied and pasted into the brutal death scene, you wonder why someone would have spent four hours and seventeen minutes creating it in the first place. Or why 1.9 million viewers have watched it.

What do you think, readers? Is this a digital masterpiece or a creepy Photoshop fail?

Also on HuffPost:

Suggest a correction