Jerry Cullen may come from a part of Great Britain known as Swineshead, but his own noggin is better suited for eggs -- literally.

Cullen just became the world champion in the little known sport of "Egg Russian Roulette." It's game where two competitors pick eggs from a box of six. Five of have been hard boiled, and one is left raw, according to ITN.co.uk. The players smash the eggs against their faces and the first shell to crack loses the game.

The "egg-citing" sport is just one of the many "eggs-tra-ordinary" events at the 7th Annual World Egg Throwing Championships which took place this past weekend in Swaton, Lincolnshire, England.

Other events include egg throwing events for two-player and 11-player teams and a tossing event using trebuchets, a Medieval weapon similar to a catapult.

However, organizer Andy Dunlop has a soft spot in his heart for the hard-boiled sport of Egg Russian Roulette and hopes Cullen's victory scrambles preconceived notions that it is a joke.

"They said there's no skill involved," Dunlop told ITN. "We're here today to prove that there is skill."

Teams from all over the world winged it to the Egg Tossing Olympics. Cullen's victory ensured at least one victory for the home country, but the Dutch team managed to win the distance-throwing event nearly 120 feet for a second time, although this poultry pitch was shorter than their previous record of 208 feet.

Still, Dunlop said the tossing teams were helped this year by the implementation of new regulation equipment.

"We use a particular breed of chicken which gives harder shells therefore they should be able to be thrown over 70 metres," Dunlop told the BBC before the event.

Despite the relative newness of the tourney, egg tossing as a sport dates back to 1322 when a newly appointed Abbot of Swaton ensured attendance at church by providing peasants with one egg each. However, when the River Eau flooded that year, monks were forced to hurl eggs over to waiting peasants who were unable to attend the service, according to Metro.co.uk.