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  • Ralph Nader

    Ralph Nader attends the Time 100 Gala celebrating the Time 100 issue of the Most Influential People In The World at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 24, 2012, in New York.

  • Ralph Nader

    Former U.S. Sen. Bill Bradley, left, and Ralph Nader attend the TIME 100 Gala, TIME'S 100 Most Influential People In The World, cocktail party at Jazz at Lincoln Center on April 24, 2012 in New York City.

  • Ralph Nader

    Consumer advocate Ralph Nader speaks during a conference on Transportation Security Administration procedures Jan. 6, 2011, at the Carnegie Institute for Science in Washington, D.C.

  • Ralph Nader

    Consumer advocate Ralph Nader speaks during a hearing of the House Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill May 21, 2009, in Washington, D.C. Consumer advocate Ralph Nader and others appeared before the committee to testify about the effect of auto industry bankruptcies on the United States.

  • Ralph Nader

    Independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader (center) stands with supporters before speaking to a crowd October 16, 2008 in New York City. Nader denounced the Wall Street bailout plan and urged drastically increased regulation of the nation's financial system.

  • Ralph Nader

    In this Dec. 13, 2011, photo, Ralph Nader stands next to his poster of Lou Gehrig in his office in Washington. Over a five-decade career in America's consumer movement, Nader has fought against the auto industry over safety and has targeted businesses he blamed for water pollution, nursing home fraud, and more. Now the sports industry is drawing an increasing share of Nader's attention and anger - it's "spinning out of control," he says, amid sex-abuse scandals, labor strife and rampant commercialization.

  • Ralph Nader

    Political activist and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader addresses hundreds of members of National Nurses United and their supporters during a rally in Laffayette Square across from the White House before marching to the U.S. Treasury Department Nov. 3, 2011 in Washington, D.C. In the spirit of the Occupy Wall Street movement, members of various labor unions with the AFL-CIO joined the nurses in their call to tax financial transactions on Wall Street and around the world as a way of reducing the national debt.

  • Ralph Nader

    Consumer activist and independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader speaks to a crowd in front of the New York Stock Exchange Oct. 16, 2008, in New York City. Nader denounced the Wall Street bailout plan and urged drastically increased regulation of the nation's financial system.

  • Ralph Nader

    National Nurses United organizer Bill Gallagher (L) and political activist and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader talk with supporters during a rally in Lafayette Square across from the White House before marching to the U.S. Treasury Department November 3, 2011, in Washington, D.C. In the spirit of the Occupy Wall Street movement, members of various labor unions with the AFL-CIO joined the nurses in their call to tax financial transactions on Wall Street and around the world as a way of reducing the national debt.

  • Ralph Nader

    Consumer rights activist Ralph Nader attends a rally by healthcare workers and union members in Lafayette Square Nov. 3, 2011, in Washington, D.C.

WASHINGTON -- A coalition of public interest groups and activists led by Ralph Nader plan to announce an effort to urge people to show up late to work in the coming months to raise awareness over the District of Columbia's "colonial status."

DC Vote, the organization that advocates for D.C. voting rights and statehood, will join the Center for Study of Responsive Law, Nader and other public interest advocates Monday morning to announce plans for a symbolic "limited general strike."

What does that mean? The coalition of groups "has pledged to postpone their arrival at work for 15 minutes on July 9, 2012, 30 minutes on August 1, 2012, 45 minutes on September 10, 2012 and one hour on October 1, 2012," according to a media advisory from DC Vote.

As The Washington Post's Mike DeBonis notes, the action Nader and the coalition is calling for has a poor track record of effectiveness:

The general strike has been considered an ineffective and archaic form of protest in American society for — let’s be kind — a few decades now. But if the risible suggestion that a “limited general strike” might budge the status quo even microscopically somehow results in a few more people realizing the utter fecklessness of orthodox protest tactics in the D.C. voting-rights arena, I suppose one might just consider it worthwhile.

For years, Nader has supported the D.C.'s efforts to attain a full and equal vote in Congress. Last year, Nader hoped that the uprising in Egypt would inspire renewed efforts in D.C. to secure expanded voting rights.

Residents of the nation's capital have a non-voting delegate in the House of Representatives and no Senate representation.

In a recent blog post about a fundraising appeal from President Obama, Nader chastised the president "about his forgotten promise in 2008 to end the colonial status of the nation’s capital and fight for voting representation in Congress for its disenfranchised people."

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