In case the power of a piranha's bite was ever in question, here's some video evidence to ensure that explorers think twice before wading through waters in the Ecuadorian rainforest.

In this 2011 YouTube clip, which recently surfaced on Reddit, a man demonstrates just how sharp piranhas' teeth can be by placing a stick in front of the creature. Sure enough, the piranha chomps off the edge of the stick with little to no effort.

According to the video's description, the bite test took place in the Cuyabeno Reserve in the Ecuadorian rainforest.

Equipped with strong jaws and interlocking teeth, piranhas often feast on insects and other fish, but they have been seen attacking larger animals as large as horses, according to Animal Planet. The fish, which are native to several parts of South America, can also turn to cannibalism if their food supply is limited.

However, though piranhas are known for eating meat, they rarely attack humans, National Geographic notes.

Recent research published in the Journal of Experimental Biology explained that certain piranhas emit "barking" noises to scare off other piranhas in their vicinity.

Red-bellied piranhas, which are indigenous to areas including Brazil, Ecuador and Venezuela, produce three combative sounds: the barking noise, a "drum-like percussive sound" emitted when they were fighting over food, and a "croaking" sound that they made with their jaws, according to Live Science explains.

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