The economic downturn has set women back.

Men have landed 77 percent of all new jobs from the end of the recession until June, according to the Labor Department (h/t the Los Angeles Times). That means that with women having landed less than one-quarter of all new jobs, they're at risk of falling behind.

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate for women aged 16 and over has fallen just 4 percent since the end of the recession, while the unemployment rate for men has plunged 21 percent since the end of the recession, according to the Labor Department.

Though men suffered disproportionately during the recession, as jobs in male-dominated sectors such as manufacturing and construction began to disappear, they've benefited disproportionately from recent job growth.

At the same time, women have seen outsized job losses during the recovery. The Pew Research Center said in a recent report that women are the only group they studied whose job growth lagged behind population growth between 2009 and 2011.

Women also have been disproportionately hurt by government job cuts at the state and local level, since many work in the public sector. A report by the National Women's Law Center released last week found that severe public-sector job cuts at the state and local level are the largest obstacle to women getting back to work.