Where are the jobs going to come from for young workers in OECD countries? The past few decades have seen a loss of traditional manufacturing jobs to the emerging markets. These jobs are lost for the foreseeable future. New jobs that are being created tend to be relatively low paid and unskilled service-provision roles.

Christopher Pissarides identifies two ways governments can help make these jobs more palatable – raising the minimum tax allowances, i.e. raising the level of income at which tax is paid, and adapting secondary education to reflect the new paradigm.

The one-on-one session with Christopher Pissarides, Where Are the Jobs Going to Come From? can be found here.

Click here to visit the Ideas For Change Blog and Forum.

The Full Session can be found here. The 3-minute Session can be found here.

About Christopher Pissarides:
Suddenly exiled from his home in Crete in the summer of 1974, Christopher Pissarides soon found himself teaching at the London School of Economics, where he is Professor of Economics and the holder of the Norman Sosnow Chair in
Economics. He specializes in the economics of unemployment, labour-market theory and labour-market policy. More recently, he has written about growth and structural change. In 2010, Pissarides shared the Nobel Prize for Economics for his work on the economics of unemployment, especially job flows and the effects of being out of work.