Eric Hovde, an outspoken critic of the federal stimulus program and Republican Senate candidate in Wisconsin, sits on the board of a technology company that was granted more than $2 million from the same initiative, the Associated Press reported Tuesday.

Hovde, who is running for the GOP nomination to replace retiring Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.), has called himself the "second-largest shareholder" of Herndon, Va.-based ePlus,according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The company sells computer services and products, such as data centers and cloud computing.

Recovery.gov, a federal government website tracking stimulus spending, shows that ePlus received more than $2.3 million in federal department grants set up by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

Hovde's campaign told the Associated Press that he "beneficially owns less than 15 percent, both directly and indirectly," of ePlus, downplaying any notion that Hovde is a key player in the company's operations.

Hovde has said he opposes the federal stimulus, which has emerged as a flashpoint in the Wisconsin Senate race as other candidates have been tied to benefiting companies.

Hovde opponent and former Wisconsin Gov. Tommy Thompson pounced on the stimulus hypocrisy as an example of Hovde's coziness with Beltway politics.

"Eric Hovde has spent the past 24 years in Washington, D.C., selling access and leveraging government-assisted transactions," Thompson spokesman Brian Nemoir told the AP. "The latest revelation that Hovde has benefited from stimulus dollars is nothing but business as usual."

10 more election stories from beyond the presidential field:

House Candidate Charged With Underage Drinking [The Item]

Hoekstra Files Charges Against Super PAC [Traverse City Record-Eagle]

Congressional Candidate's Father Arrested In NY [Wall Street Journal]

Fight For Bill Kentron's Endorsement Ends With Split Decision [The Tennessean]

Former Democratic Gov Candidate To Lead Mountain Party [Charleston Daily Mail]

Congressional Candidate Maldonado's Wife Involved In Fatal Crash [San Francisco Chronicle]

McCotter's Mess: Confusion Hangs Over 11th Congressional District Election [MLive.com]

Democrats Tap Lownethal For Strong Campaign Help [Los Angeles Times]

Republicans Open Fire On Gregg In Indiana Governor's Race [Herald Bulletin]

Lt. Gov. Dalton Declines Pay Raise In NC Budget [WFMY]

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  • House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio)

    Commenting on Occupy Wall Street and the redistribution of wealth on ABC's "This Week" recently, <a href="http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/week-transcript-speaker-john-boehner/story?id=14892830&page=5#.TswHj3NPkqV" target="_hplink">House Speaker John Boehner said</a>: <blockquote>Come on. The top 1 percent pay 38 percent of the income taxes in America. You know, how much more do you want them to pay? Well, I'll tell you what: Let's take all the money that the rich have, all of it. It won't even put a dent in our current budget deficit, much less our debt.</blockquote>

  • Rep. Larry Bucshon (R-Ind.)

    Rep. Larry Bucshon <a href="http://gcdailyworld.com/story/1786079.html" target="_hplink">said in an interview</a> with a local Indiana paper that the tax code needs to be simplified, and he invoked the Republican party line that the wealthiest Americans are creating jobs: <blockquote>I'm not for raising taxes on one sector of the economy. I think right now when you have a high unemployment and you raise taxes on the higher income earners, and they are not going to create any jobs. Arguing right now that the higher income earners aren't paying their fair share is not true. The data shows that. The top 1 percent of income earners are paying about 38 percent of the taxes. The top 10 percent are paying about 70 percent of the taxes.</blockquote>

  • Rep. Mike Kelly (R-Pa.)

    During an House Education and the Workforce Committee markup, <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CEArFmRDtrw&feature=youtu.be" target="_hplink">Rep. Mike Kelly made a plea</a> to "stop railing against the really wealthy": <blockquote>I've got to tell you something. As a guy who has had to pay his own way his whole life, I am greatly offended by the idea that somehow somebody in Washington knows how to spend my money better than I do. That somebody in Washington knows how to regulate me to the point where I can't even borrow money anymore. You want to talk about people who are afraid? The small banks. They're scared to death to do anything. Why? Because their government has such onerous regulations on them anymore that they don't know about the rules and the regulations that have been put through or haven't even been written. So when you want to sit back and talk about these wealthy, evil people ... you want them to spend money? Make their future certain.</blockquote>

  • Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.)

    Commenting on President Barack Obama's proposed jobs bill in September, Rep. Scott DesJarlais also <a href="http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:uHUJCTcKdokJ:www.wbir.com/rss/article/183289/2/TN-lawmakers-reaction-mixed-on-Obama-speech-+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a " target="_hplink">used the "job creators" line</a>. The congressman argued that wealthy Americans are "shouldering the burden" by "already paying the lion's share of taxes, and taxing them more is going to hurt jobs."

  • Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-Texas)

    Two months ago, a handful of local Democrats protested outside Rep. Blake Farenthold's office in opposition to the proposed Buffett Rule Act, which would allow taxpayers to make donations with their income tax returns to help pay down the federal public debt. The bill was named after billionaire Warren Buffett, who has said he should be paying more in taxes. GOP lawmakers responded by suggesting wealthy Americans voluntarily donate extra money when they file their tax returns. "I think everybody is paying their fair share," <a href="http://www.kiiitv.com/story/15591779/local-democrats-stage-protest-on-congressman-farenthold" target="_hplink">Farenthold said</a>, adding, "And before we look at raising taxes on anybody, we've got to get the government spending under control. There's no point in pouring more money into something when it's hemorrhaging out the other end."

  • Rep. Ann Marie Buerkle (R-N.Y.)

    In March, months before the Occupy Wall Street movement arose, Rep. Ann Marie Buerkle <a href="http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/03/half_applaud_half_jeer_at_rep.html" target="_hplink">expressed sadness</a> at the class warfare in America. "The middle class is being screwed," said the congresswoman at a town hall meeting, but added that the wealthy aren't to blame. "Why do we have class warfare?" she said. "Why do we want to punish the rich? They worked hard for their money."

  • Rep. John Fleming (R-La.)

    Rep. John Fleming made more than $6 million last year, according to the <em>Wall Street Journal</em>. In September on MSNBC, he <a href="http://www.rawstory.com/rawreplay/2011/09/tea-party-rep-only-400000-left-after-i-feed-my-family/" target="_hplink">used himself as an example</a> of why he opposes raising taxes on millionaires: <blockquote>The amount that I have to reinvest in my business and feed my family is more like $600,000 of that $6.3 million. And so by the time I feed my family, I have maybe $400,000 left over to invest in new locations, upgrade my locations, buy more equipment.</blockquote> MSNBC's Chris Jansing responded that the average American makes more like $40,000, $50,000 or $60,000 a year, to which Fleming responded: <blockquote>Again, class warfare never created a job. That's people that will not get jobs. This is all about creating jobs. It's not about attacking people who make certain incomes. You know, in this country most people feel that being successful in their businesses is a virtue, not a vice. And once we begin to identify it as a vice, this country is going down.</blockquote>

  • Rep. Dan Benishek (R-Mich.)

    In August amidst the heated debate over raising the debt ceiling, Rep. Dan Benishek <a href="http://www.petoskeynews.com/news/pnr-benishek-delves-into-debt-ceiling-vote-federal-budget-during-forum-20110824,0,4643945.story" target="_hplink">addressed federal spending</a> at a public forum in Michigan. The congressman said that he would like to ease up on taxing corporations' foreign earnings and that he disagrees with raising taxes on oil companies. <blockquote>I think oil companies pay their fair share. I can understand where the oil company wants to deduct the cost of drilling a well. That's one of the tax breaks for oil companies, the subsidies. They get to deduct the cost of the well the year you drill.</blockquote>