As reported by the Wall Street Journal in the above video, an increasing number of immigrants from Mexico, Central America and South America have found their green card applications denied. The reason? U.S. officials maintain they pose a security threat as the tattoos are symbols of criminal gang affiliation.

But many immigrants deny this, stating that their tattoos are ornamental -- no different than the tattoos sported by thousands of people in U.S. cities -- and that their treatment conflicts with the First Amendment right to freedom of expression.

What do you think? Tell us in the comments section below.

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  • In this Aug. 29, 2012 photo, the leader of the Guatemala branch of the M-18 gang, Aldo Dupie Ochoa Mejia, alias "El Lobo" or "The Wolf," smiles as poses for photos inside the Frajines 1 prison in Guatemala City. Mejia says his gang is considering and willing to make a truce with their rival, the MS-13 gang, such as the one that appears to be holding in El Salvador. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

  • In this Sept. 1, 2012 photo, an inmate belonging to the Mara 18 gang embraces his girlfriend during visitation time for families of inmates inside the prison in Cojutepeque, El Salvador. Six months after El Salvador brokered an historic truce between two rival gangs to curb the nation's daunting homicide rate, officials are split over whether the truce actually works. In March, MS-13 and its rival, Barrio 18, vowed to end the killings and the forced recruitments in exchange for better conditions for incarcerated gang leaders, who run their operations from behind bars. The gangs, which also operate in Guatemala and Honduras, are seeking truce talks in those countries as well. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, alleged members of the MS-13 or Mara Salvatrucha gang arrested on murder and gun possession charges are loaded into a police pick-up truck after being presented to the press in San Salvador, El Salvador. Six months after El Salvador brokered an historic truce between two rival gangs to curb the nation's daunting homicide rate, officials are split over whether the truce actually works. The gangs, which also operate in Guatemala and Honduras, are seeking truce talks in those countries as well. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • In this Aug. 31, 2012 photo, Larios Benitez, alias "Buda," an alleged member of the MS-13 or Mara Salvatrucha gang arrested on murder and gun possession charges is shown to the press in San Salvador , El Salvador. Six months after El Salvador brokered an historic truce between two rival gangs to curb the nation's daunting homicide rate, officials are split over whether the truce actually works. The gangs, which also operate in Guatemala and Honduras, are seeking truce talks in those countries as well. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • FILE - In this Nov.24, 2005 file photo shows unidentified members of the gang Mara Salvatrucha who are incarcerated in the National Penitentiary of Tamara, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. The deadliest prison blaze in a century has drawn attention to an unfortunate U.S. export to Central America, street gangs. Prisons in Honduras and elsewhere in Central America are teeming with inmates who belong to gangs that have their roots in Southern California. Refugees of the region

  • A Mara Salvatrucha gang member attends a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Female inmates attend a mass marking one hundred days since a peace agreement was reached among gangs' members at the women's prison of Ilopango in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Shackled inmate Noelio Calderon, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, adjusts his old prosthetic leg at a clinic where he is getting measured for a new one in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The plan to fit disabled gang inmates with prosthetic limbs is part of a peace process between gangs, pushed by the Catholic Church and the government. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • A female inmate and Monsignor Fabio Colindres, left, shake hands during a mass marking one hundred days since a peace agreement was reached among gangs' members at the women's prison of Ilopango in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Female inmates, some of them holding their children, attend a mass marking one hundred days since a peace agreement was reached among gangs' members at the women's prison of Ilopango in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, June 26, 2012. Leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • A prison guard, top, watches over shackled inmate Jin Sanchez, left, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, as he is fitted for a new prosthetic leg at a clinic in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The plan to fit disabled gang inmates with prosthetic limbs is part of a peace process between gangs, pushed by the Catholic Church and the government. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Shackled inmate Santos Sanchez, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, puts his prosthetic leg back on after being measured for a new one at a clinic in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The plan to fit disabled gang inmates with prosthetic limbs is part of a peace process between gangs, pushed by the Catholic Church and the government. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Handcuffed inmate Noelio Calderon, a member of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, gets his amputated leg bandaged by Teresa Palacios, from the PODES, an organization that helps the disabled, during the process of creating a prosthetic leg for him at a clinic in San Salvador, El Salvador, Tuesday, May 29, 2012. The plan to fit disabled gang inmates with prosthetic limbs is part of a peace process between gangs, pushed by the Catholic Church and the government. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • In this March 8, 2012 photo, a police officer inspects tattoos on a Mara Salvatrucha gang member Jose Alexander Carranza after his arrest in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. A wave of violence has made Honduras among the most dangerous places on Earth, with a homicide rate roughly 20 times that of the U.S. rate, according to a 2011 United Nations report. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

  • Behind bars, a Mara Salvatrucha gang member attends a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, left, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, is greeted by Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang after a mass celebrated by Pezzuto and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Aristides Umanzor, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • A Mara Salvatrucha gang member attends a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres, right, greets Mara Salvatrucha gang members during a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador and Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Mara Salvatrucha gang members attend a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • A Mara Salvatrucha gang member, watching a crucifix of a fellow inmate, smiles as they attend a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador, left, gives communion to a Mara Salvatrucha gang member during a mass celebrated by Pezzuto and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)

  • Dionisio Aristides Umanzor, known as El Sirra, leader of the Mara Salvatrucha gang, delivers a speech to fellow inmates, media members and authorities during a mass celebrated by Archbishop Luigi Pezzuto, Apostolic Nuncio to El Salvador and head army and police chaplain Monsignor Fabio Colindres at a prison in Ciudad Barrios, El Salvador, Monday, March 26, 2012. According to Aristides Umanzor, leaders of the Mara Salvatrucha and the Mara 18, El Salvador's two largest street gangs, have reached a truce, reducing the country's homicide rate, one of the highest in the world. (AP Photo/Luis Romero)