JOPLIN, Mo. — A mosque in southwest Missouri burned to the ground early Monday in the second fire to hit the Islamic center in little more than a month, and investigators spent the day combing through the wreckage searching for evidence of arson.

No injuries were reported, but the Islamic Society of Joplin's building was a total loss after the blaze, first reported at about 3:30 a.m., the Jasper County Sheriff's Office said. As of late Monday, nobody had been arrested in connection with the fire.

Investigators from the FBI, the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms and the Jasper County Sheriff's department were at the scene all day Monday, moving the rubble with a bulldozer and other equipment. A specially trained dog assisted.

Only remnants indicated a building had been there, including some stone pillars that were still standing and a few pieces of charred plywood loosely held up by a frame.

While investigators did their work, a small group of Muslims gathered for an evening prayer on the lawn of the destroyed building.

"This is what we stand for," said Dr. Ahmed Asadullah, a member of the Islamic Society of Joplin. "Freedom of religion. Freedom of speech."

It was the second time this summer investigators had been called to the Islamic center, located in a former church on the outskirts of Joplin. A fire reported around the same time on July 4 has been determined to be arson, but no charges have been filed. The FBI has released a video of a suspect caught on surveillance video and offered a $15,000 reward for information leading to an arrest in that fire.

Michael Kaste, special agent in charge of the Kansas City office of the FBI, said the investigation into Monday's fire was in the preliminary stages, and that about 30 people had been assigned to the investigation.

"Any act of violence to a house of worship is taken very seriously by law enforcement, and threatens the very core of the safety and security of our communities," Kaste said.

Kaste said it was too early to say if there was surveillance video available from the Monday fire. The Jasper County Sheriff's office said earlier Monday the video equipment had been destroyed. The FBI was encouraging anyone with information about either fire to call authorities.

"We just want to get the word out there to generate people to really come forward," he said.

Jasper County Sheriff Archie Dunn said patrols at the mosque had been stepped up since the July 4 fire at the mosque was determined to be arson.

Imam Lahmuddin, who leads the mosque and was in the building until late Sunday, said he was "sad and shocked" about the fire. He had been at the mosque since before dawn Monday, and remained there late in the evening.

"Maybe there is something we are supposed to learn from this," he said.

A Washington-based Muslim civil rights organization meanwhile called for more police protection at mosques and other houses of worship following the Joplin fire and a deadly attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin. The Council on American-Islamic Relations also offered a $10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever started the mosque fire.

About 50 families belong to the Islamic Society of Joplin, which opened in 2007 as a mosque and community center. The FBI led an investigation in 2008 when the mosque's sign was torched. That crime also remained unsolved.

Lahmuddin, who has lived in Joplin for about four years, said several people were at the center late Sunday. He said despite the attacks, the center's members have good relationships with residents and other churches. He said many are doctors at area hospitals. The center also served as a shelter and staging area for volunteers who came to help Joplin after the May 22 ripped through the city, killing 161 people.

On Sunday, a gunman killed six people at a Sikh temple in suburban Milwaukee. The imam said it was a cause of great concern that both faiths had seemingly come under attack.

Jill Michel, pastor of the South Joplin Christian Church, said several area churches have offered their churches to members of the Islamic Society if they need a place to gather. She said she and other faith leaders from the community had been at a dinner Saturday at the center, and that the community would rally around the center's members.

But, she said, the shooting at the Sikh temple in the Milwaukee area was also on her mind.

"I can't imagine driving up to my church and having it burned to the ground," Michel said. "I worry about what any of this sort of thing says about humanity."

Click through the slideshow to see most and least Muslim states in America:
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  • Illinois

    2,800 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Virginia

    2,663 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • New York

    2,028 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • New Jersey

    1,827 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Texas

    1,678 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Michigan

    1,218 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Florida

    877 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Delaware

    793 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • California

    732 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • District of Columbia

    670 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Pennsylvania

    634 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Maryland

    632 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Georgia

    543 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Connecticut

    375 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Nebraska

    337 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Colorado

    333 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Massachusetts

    332 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Minnesota

    317 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people. Photo: Ramadan at Islamic Center of Twin Ports in Duluth, Minnesota

  • Ohio

    290 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Washington

    284 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • North Carolina

    273 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Kansas

    271 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Wisconsin

    259 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Kentucky

    256 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Tennessee

    242 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Indiana

    225 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Louisiana

    216 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Alabama

    215 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Iowa

    214 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • New Mexico

    200 Muslim adherents per 100,00

  • Oklahoma

    197 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Missouri

    195 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Utah

    181 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Mississippi

    169 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • South Dakota

    164 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Rhode Island

    137 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Arizona

    134 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Alaska

    130 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Arkansas

    128 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Wyoming

    127 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • South Carolina

    125 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • New Hampshire

    123 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Idaho

    110 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Oregon

    104 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • West Virginia

    103 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Maine

    100 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • North Dakota

    95 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Nevada

    63 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Vermont

    48 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Hawaii

    45 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.

  • Montana

    34 Muslim adherents per 100,000 people.