Police searching a former apartment of the shooter who killed six people at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, found a gun and arrested his ex-girlfriend on Tuesday.

Misty Cook lived with Wade Michael Page in Milwaukee until June when the couple split. A team from the FBI and South Milwaukee Police Department looking for evidence related to Sunday's shooting spree in Oak Creek locked up Cook for illegal possession of a firearm, ABC News said.

The 31-year-old nursing student and waitress is barred from owning guns, because of a felony conviction from 2005 for fleeing and eluding a traffic officer, the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported.

The seized gun was not related to the temple shooting , according to TV-station Fox 6.

Authorities have said they believe Page, a musician in a skinhead hardcore band, acted alone. The 40-year-old former member of the Army was shot to death by police outside the temple.

Researchers say Cook was part of the white supremacist movement in which her ex-boyfriend was an active member.

The Anti-Defamation League, which monitors extremist groups, released a photograph of Cook wearing a t-shirt of white power group Volksfront and holding a beer bottle.

In 2007 and 2008, Cook was actively involved in Volksfront, the Los Angeles Times reported. She was linked to another neo-Nazi group, Hammerskin, with which Page also had ties.

Cook, her son, and Page moved into the South Milwaukee apartment in November, according to the Journal-Sentinel. Neighbors told the newspaper that the couple kept to themselves and sometimes blared loud music.

Pete Simi, a professor at the University of Nebraska, met Page 10 years ago while researching hate groups. Page told him the neo-Nazi thinking first appealed to him when he was in the Army. Simi believed that Page was a heavy drinker and had never come to grips with his parents' divorce nor his mother's death.

UPDATE: The FBI now says that Page died from a self-inflicted gunshot after being wounded by police. An FBI agent also said Cook's arrest isn't linked to the slayings.

TEMPLE SHOOTING VICTIMS AND THEIR FAMILIES

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  • In this undated combo photo composed of two images provided by the family, Indian Ranjit Singh, right, and Sita Singh who were killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin are seen. The Indian born brothers were both killed in the shooting attack Sunday. (AP Photo)

  • Indian relatives of brothers Sita and Ranjit Singh who were killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, look at family photos at the family home in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012.

  • Ranjeet Singh

    In this undated family photo released Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, Indian Ranjeet Singh, who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, is shown. Singh, one of the victims of a shooting attack at a Sikh temple in the United States, never came home to India even once in 16 years, working at a grocery store during the week and volunteering at the Sikh gurdwara on weekends. He promised his family in India he was doing what had to be done to get a green card so they could come join him in the United States. (AP Photo/Ranjeet Singh family)

  • Indian Lokinder Kaur, third from right, mourns with her daughters Jasbir Kaur, 24, fourth from right, and Jaspreet Kaur, 21, second right, as they gather with other relatives at the family home in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. Lokinder Kaur's husband Ranjeet Singh, one of the victims of a shooting attack at a Sikh temple in the United Staes, never came home to India even once in 16 years, working at a grocery store during the week and volunteering at the Sikh gurdwara on weekends. He promised his family in India he was doing what had to be done to get a green card so they could come join him in the United States. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • Sita Singh

    In this undated family photo released Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012, Indian Sita Singh, who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, is seen. Singh was killed during the attack on Sunday alongside his brother Ranjeet Singh who he had recently joined in the United States. (AP Photo/Seeta Singh family)

  • Sita and Ranjeet Singh

    Indian friends and relatives of Sita Singh who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, visit the family home in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. Singh was killed alongside his brother Ranjeet Singh who he had recently joined in the United States during the attack on Sunday. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • Indian Surinder Kaur, center, the wife of Sita Singh who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, is comforted by her son Armeet and daughter Sarabjit, second right, at the family home in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. Sita Singh was killed alongside his brother Ranjeet Singh who he had recently joined him in the United States during the attack on Sunday. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • Suveg Singh

    This undated photo provided by Mandeep Singh shows Suveg Singh Khattra. Balginder Khattra of Oak Creek, Wis. said Monday, Aug. 6, 2012, that his 84-year-old father, Suveg Singh Khattra, was among the dead in Sunday's shooting at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis. (AP Photo/Courtesy Mandeep Singh)

  • Indian Surinder Kaur, center, the wife of Sia Singh who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin, is comforted by her son Armeet and daughter Sarabjit, right, at the family home in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2012. Seeta Singh was killed alongside his brother Ranjeet Singh who he had recently joined in the United States during the attack on Sunday. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)

  • Harinder Kaur Rakhra, left, sister of Satwant Singh Kaleka who was killed in the shooting attack at a Sikh temple in the U.S. state of Wisconsin, is consoled by Seema Sharma, a local politician in Patiala, India, Monday, Aug. 6, 2012


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