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Veteran Unemployment Solvable With Viral Videos?

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While viral videos are often associated only with fleeting internet fame, their ability to affect more weighty issues is currently being put to the test.

Training Camp, an IT training and certification firm, launched a contest that will utilize viral videos in an attempt to bring awareness to the issue of veteran unemployment. At stake is a pool of $10,000 in prize money.

The vet unemployment rate is at a three-year-low currently, the lowest monthly vet unemployment rate since before President Obama took office, according to Think Progress. Many credit Obama's initiatives, but we have to wonder if efforts such as the Transition Assistance Program and the VOW to Hire Heroes Act will pale in comparison to the creativity of the internet.

The contest calls for lighthearted, even silly, video submissions, according to Mashable, that explain why employers should hire vets.

And the contest benefits not just unemployed vets, but wounded vets as well. Each video will result in a $25 donation to Wounded Warrior Project, an organization that is dedicating to raising awareness and support for wounded service members.

"People aren't aware this is an issue," Michael McNelis, educational services director at Training Camp, told Mashable. "…Our goal is that every person who sees the videos realizes this is an issue. It's like, 'Look at this picture and tell me why you don't support this.'"

Training Camp has already seen huge interest in the contest. Since it commenced on July 4, 300 contenders have entered to win a piece of the $10,000 pool of prize money -- and submissions will continue to be accepted through September.

Submit a video here, and check out the final contenders on September 14.

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