In a cornucopia of colors, textures and materials, "Design for a Living World" has showcased the possibility of a balance between environmental ethics and the world of art and fashion.

Utilizing sustainable materials that won't leave a dent in a region's delicate ecosystem, 10 designers created furniture, jewelry, clothing, accessories and photographs for the Nature Conservancy's exhibit, which has been on display at the Coral Gables Museum since July 26.

Big name designers, including Isaac Mizrahi and Kate Spade New York, have their work displayed using materials not found at any old store. Mizrahi created an ethereal dress from salmon leather from fish caught in southwest Alaska, using tiny sequins of fish skin.

Traveling further south to Bolivia, Paulina Reyes, a designer for Kate Spade New York, learned to weave in the tradition of the locals to create handbags with wood tiles certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, adorned with hand-carved flowers etched on every piece.

Also on display are pieces of furniture from designers Maya Lin and Ezri Tarazi. Lin's work is inspired by the Upper St. John River in Maine, while Tarazi traveld to Yunan Province in China for bamboo to create a unique chaise lounge.

"Design for a Living World" opening at New York's Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, then made its rounds in Phoenix and Chicago. The Coral Gables Museum exhibit closes on Oct. 25 with a celebration and auction to benefit the Nature Conservancy.

See what work is on display at the museum:

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  • Dress and jacket made from salmon-leather, designed for The Nature Conservancy's "Design for a Living World" project by Isaac Mizrahi. Constructed from salmon skin (leather) caught in the waters of southwest Alaska. Studio photograph taken for the exhibit catalog and book, "Design for a Living World".

  • Isaac Mizrahi's salmon leather ensemble consists of a short dress worn with a long jacket that trails on the floor like a mermaid tail. Mizrahi worked with a Parisian maker of fashion embellishments to turn pelts of salmon leather into palettes. First, the leather was skived (shaved down to make it thinner), then die-cut it into small disks perforated for sewing. Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project and exhibit.

  • Isaac Mizrahi's salmon leather ensemble consists of a short dress worn with a long jacket that trails on the floor like a mermaid tail. Mizrahi worked with a Parisian maker of fashion embellishments to turn pelts of salmon leather into paillettes. First, the leather was skived (shaved down to make it thinner), then die-cut it into small disks perforated for sewing.Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project and exhibit.

  • Small disks made from salmon leather, (Salmon caught in Alaska) which will be used in the creation of a dress by fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project and exhibit.

  • Paulina Reyes, a designer from Kate Spade New York, traveled to the remote village of Salvatierra, Bolivia where she learned how to weave in the traditional style of these indigenous women. Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project and exhibit.

  • Green Handbag made with hand-carved FSC-certified wood tiles (flower tiles individually hand carved in a Bolivian workshop) stitched to the cotton fabric understructure for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project. Kate Spade fashion designer Paulina Reyes worked with artisans in Bolivia to experiment with different weaving techniques and materials.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • Chair designed for The Nature Conservancy's "Design for a Living World" project by Abbott Miller and Brian Raby. Constructed from FSC-certified wood harvested from Bolivia's vast, managed forests. Studio photograph taken for the exhibit catalog and book, "Design for a Living World."

  • Paulina Reyes, a designer for Kate Spade, works with women to create a purse in the village of Salvatierra. The women are part of a group called the Association of Artisans of Galiliea. Photograph used for the "Design for Living World" exhibit book.

  • Dutch designer Hella Jongerius stretches chicle latex in her studio in Rotterdam as she experiments with the material's practical uses. Photograph used in the exhibit book from the "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Dutch designer Hella Jongerius stretches chicle latex in her studio in Rotterdam as she experiments with the material's practical uses. Photograph used in the exhibit book from the "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Dutch designer Hella Jongerius stretches chicle latex in her studio in Rotterdam as she experiments with the material's practical uses. Photograph used in the exhibit book from the "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Objects created by Dutch designer Hella Jongerius as she experiments with the chicle latex in her Rotterdam studio. Photograph used in the exhibit book from the "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • A studio staff member working for Dutch designer Hella Jongerius applies chicle latex to a design object in her Rotterdam studio. Jongerius experiments with the material's practical uses. Photograph used in the exhibit book from the "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Experimenting with chicle latex from the Maya Forest of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Dutch designer Hella Jongerius creates uniquely collaged products, such as unique ceramic vases and sculpture objects showing stitching and perforation in her Rotterdam studio. Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Experimenting with chicle latex from the Maya Forest of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Dutch designer Hella Jongerius creates uniquely collaged products, such as unique ceramic vases and sculpture objects showing stitching and perforation in her Rotterdam studio. Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Experimenting with chicle latex from the Maya Forest of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, Dutch designer Hella Jongerius creates uniquely collaged products, such as unique ceramic vases and sculpture objects showing stitching and perforation in her Rotterdam studio. Photograph taken for The Nature Conservancy's "Design for a Living World" project and exhibition.

  • Architect, artist and furniture designer Maya Lin in her studio in New York examines different types of FSC-certified wood from The Nature Conservancy's property in northern Maine. Photograph used for the "Design for Living World" exhibit book.

  • Table designed by Maya Lin for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" exhibit. Lin's designs are evocative of the rugged terrain of the Upper St. John River in Maine. The wood used for her table came from FSC-certified land managed by The Nature Conservancy.

  • Terrain sculpture created by Maya Lin for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" exhibit. Lin's designs are evocative of the rugged terrain of the Upper St. John River in Maine. The wood used for her sculpture came from FSC-certified land managed by The Nature Conservancy.

  • Israeli industrial and furniture designer Ezri Tarazi explores the structural properties of bamboo in his studio. His installation of bamboo totems moves the dense landscape of China's bamboo forests indoors, creating a domestic forest that supports a range of living arrangements. Photograph used for the "Design for Living World" exhibit book.

  • Furniture designed by Israeli industrial and furniture designer Ezri Tarazi from bamboo collected in China's Yunnan Province for The Nature Conservancy's "Desgin For A Living World" project.

  • Furniture designed by Israeli industrial and furniture designer Ezri Tarazi from bamboo collected in China's Yunnan Province for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project.

  • Furniture (chaise lounge) designed by Israeli industrial and furniture designer Ezri Tarazi from bamboo collected in China's Yunnan Province for The Nature Conservancy's "Design For A Living World" project.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • TNC's newest exhibition, Design for a Living World, premieres at the Smithsonian's Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum in New York City. The Conservancy invited ten designers to create new objects from sustainable materials sourced from around the world to help raise awareness about the products we use--where they come from, how they are made and the impacts they have on our planet.

  • Swiss industrial designer Yves Béhar sketches designs in his studio in San Francisco. Béhar traveled to Costa Rica and met with a women's organic chocolate cooperative. Photograph used for the "Design for Living World" exhibit book.

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