Gov. Pat Quinn joined Illinois Muslims celebrating the end of the month-long Ramadan holiday Sunday in a ceremony in suburban Bridgeview.

The governor joined roughly 15,000 Muslim Illinoisans in prayer at Toyota Park Sunday morning, and spoke out against recent attacks against Islamic institutions in the area, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

He also commemorated the post-Ramadan holiday Eid by signing a religious tolerance bill that requires universities to provide alternate assignments to students who miss work or exams to observe holidays, ABC Chicago reports.

Illinois has more than 400,000 practicing Muslims, and during the event Sunday, Quinn vowed to "vigorously protect" their right to practice their religion freely, CBS Chicago reports. He also said he honors their commitment to their faith.

Earlier this month, U.S. Rep. Joe Walsh (R-Ill.) made controversial comments at a town hall meeting in Elk Grove Village asserting that radical Islam had permeated the Chicago suburbs and was a real threat.

Days later, three potential hate crimes were reported in the area: shots were fired at a Morton Grove mosque, a bottle bomb was found at an Islamic school in Lombard, and headstones in an Evergreen Park cemetery were defaced with anti-Muslim graffiti.

Chicago Islamic groups said Walsh's statements made them feel targeted, and expressed a heightened concern for their safety after these and other incidents reported in the Midwest.

"When elected officials, trusted by many, indicate that the enemy could be any Muslim living in your neighborhood, it gives rise to xenophobic vigilantism where fearful citizens target other Americans for simply looking different," Ahmed Rehab, Executive Director for the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) Chicago, said in a statement.

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  • Pakistani Muslims offer Jummat-ul-Vida, last Friday, prayers on a street during the holy month of Ramadan in Quetta on August 17, 2012. Muslim devotees took part in the last Friday prayers ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, which is dependent on the sighting of the moon. (BANARAS KHAN/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Indian Muslims offer prayer on the last Friday of the holy month of Ramadan at Jama Masjid, in New Delhi, India, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. Muslims across the world are marking the holy month of Ramadan. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh)

  • Kashmiri Muslim women offer Jummat-Ul-Vida, the last Friday, prayers of Ramadan at Jamia Masjid in downtown Srinagar on August 17, 2012. Muslim devotees took part in the last Friday prayers ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, which is dependent on the sighting of the moon. (ROUF BHAT/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Bangladeshi Muslims offer Jummat-Ul-Vida prayers on the last Friday of Ramadan at the National Mosque of Bangladesh, Baitul Mukarram in Dhaka on August 17, 2012 ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival. The three-day festival, which begins after the sighting of a new crescent moon, marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, during which devout Muslims abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex from dawn to dusk. (MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Sri Lankan Muslims take part in communal Friday noon prayers on the last Friday of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in Colombo on August 17, 2012, ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival. The three-day festival, which begins after the sighting of a new crescent moon, marks the end of the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, during which devout Muslims abstain from food, drink, smoking and sex from dawn to dusk. (LAKRUWAN WANNIARACHCHI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Pakistani Muslims offer Jummat-ul-Vida, last Friday, prayers on a street during the holy month of Ramadan in Quetta on August 17, 2012. Muslim devotees took part in the last Friday prayers ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, which is dependent on the sighting of the moon. (BANARAS KHAN/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Palestinian women pray at the Al-Aqsa mosque compound on the last Friday of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in Jerusalem, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. (AP Photo/Nasser Shiyoukhi)

  • Pakistani men and children, who fled their villages due to fighting between security forces and militants in Pakistan's tribal area of Bajur, offer prayers on the last Friday of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan, in a mosque in a slum area on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

  • Indian Muslims offer prayers on the last Friday of Ramadan outside the Bandra railway station in Mmbai, India, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. Muslims across the world are marking the holy month of Ramadan. (AP Photo/Rajanish Kakade)

  • Pakistani Muslims offer Jummat-ul-Vida, last Friday, prayers during the holy month of Ramadan at the grand Faisal Mosque in Islamabad on August 17, 2012. Muslim devotees took part in the last Friday prayers ahead of the Eid al-Fitr festival marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, which is dependent on the sighting of the moon. (AAMIR QURESHI/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Pakistani women and children reach for donated food during the last Friday of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan, at a restaurant in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. For many years, Pakistan required all Sunni Muslims, who make up a majority of the country's population, to pay zakat to the government. That regulation changed recently, but many Pakistanis seem unaware and continue to pull their money out of the bank to elude the state. The food is donated by wealthy local Muslims who give money to local vendors to feed the poor during Islam's holiest month. (AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen)

  • Indian Muslims break their Ramadan fast at the Jama Masjid, in New Delhi, India, Friday, Aug. 17, 2012. Muslims around the world are marking the holy fasting month of Ramadan. (AP Photo/ Manish Swarup)