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Japanese Internment Camp Captured In Stunning Kodachrome Photographs

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During World War II, the United States incarcerated thousands of Japanese Americans -- some for up to 4 years -- in remote camps without due process. Two-thirds of the 120,000 people who were sent to the camps were American citizens.

Months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, Bill Manbo of Riverside, CA, was sent to a camp in Wyoming with his family. Manbo, an amateur photographer, documented his time there in stunning Kodachrome pictures recently published in Colors of Confinement.

Manbo's photos capture daily life in the camp, including shots of his family, a Boy Scout parade, and prisoners queuing up to see a movie. Check out the pictures from Colors of Confinement below.

From COLORS OF CONFINEMENT: RARE KODACHROME PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION IN WORLD WAR II edited by Eric L. Muller. Copyright © 2012 by the University of North Carolina Press. Photographs by Bill Manbo copyright © 2012 by Takao Bill Manbo. Published in association with the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Used by permission of the publisher. www.uncpress.unc.edu

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COLORS OF CONFINEMENT: RARE KODACHROME PHOTOGRAPHS OF JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION IN WORLD WAR II
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