SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico -- Hundreds of police officers in Puerto Rico are taking to the streets to demand higher salaries and the payment of back wages.

Police accuse the government of not honoring several laws that among other things would give them an additional $200 a month. The officers plan to file a complaint Tuesday with an appeals court.

Puerto Rico has the second largest police force of any U.S. jurisdiction, with some 17,000 officers. The department has come under fire due to a record number of homicides last year.

Federal prosecutors also have accused the department of corruption and civil rights violations, and the American Civil Liberties Union has also filed two lawsuits related to those complaints.

Also on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • FILE - In this June 29, 2009 file photo, suspected drug dealers are handcuffed after being detained by the police during an anti-drug raid in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico. The U.S. Caribbean territory is currently the only place in the Western hemisphere where all people, including those charged with rape and murder, are always entitled to bail. If a measure is approved in an upcoming referendum scheduled for Aug. 19, 2012, judges in Puerto Rico would be allowed to refuse bail in certain murder cases including those that were pre-meditated, occurred at someone's home or during a sexual assault or kidnapping, targeted public officials or were committed during a drive-by shooting. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

  • FILE - In this Feb. 4, 2009 file photo, a man, suspected of kidnapping and killing American tourist Sara Kuszak, sits shackled in a cell inside a police station in Fajardo, eastern Puerto Rico. The U.S. Caribbean territory is currently the only place in the Western hemisphere where all people, including those charged with rape and murder, are always entitled to bail. If a measure is approved in an upcoming referendum scheduled for Aug. 19, 2012, judges in Puerto Rico would be allowed to refuse bail in certain murder cases including those that were pre-meditated, occurred at someone's home or during a sexual assault or kidnapping, targeted public officials or were committed during a drive-by shooting. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

  • In this May 4, 2012 photo, a police patrol car drives in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, one of only a few places in Puerto Rico with public signs in English. Puerto Rico's Governor Luis Fortuno is trying to do what more than a century of American citizenship has failed to accomplish: teach Puerto Ricans to speak English as well as they do Spanish. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

  • A San Juan police officer covers a woman's face after her arrest in connection with a document fraud case in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Wednesday Jan. 11, 2012. Fifty people have been accused of conspiring to sell the identities of hundreds of Puerto Ricans to illegal immigrants on the U.S. mainland in the largest individual fraud case ever for U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, authorities said Wednesday. (AP Photo/El Vocero, Dennis A. Jones) PUERTO RICO OUT - NO USAR EN PUERTO RICO

  • FILE - This Sept. 21, 2005 file photo shows a hand-cuffed man suspected of drug-dealing making a double victory sign as he awaits booking at a police station, in Vega Baja, about 50 miles outside San Juan, Puerto Rico. Law enforcement agencies are seizing increasing amounts of suspicious cash in Puerto Rico, an apparent sign that more drug proceeds are flowing through the U.S. island territory and the Caribbean as a whole. Homeland Security reported seizures of cash rose 68 percent to nearly $2.4 million for the 12 months that ended Sept. 30, 2011. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, file)

  • City police officers stand guard at the scene of a fatal shooting in Caguas, central Puerto Rico, Friday Dec. 2, 2011. A man opened fire inside an unemployment office, killing Luis Lopez Rodriguez, age 27, and wounding another before fleeing the scene, in what government officials said appeared to be targeted attack and not a random shooting. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

  • FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2011 file photo, a forensic investigator examines the body of a man killed by unidentified gunmen at a crime scene in Carolina, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico is having its deadliest year on record as authorities struggle to control a rampant drug war on the U.S. Caribbean territory. Police said Wednesday Nov. 16, 2011 that three people died overnight in separate incidents, raising the year's homicide toll to 995, matching a 1994 record with six weeks left to go in the year. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

  • Thomas E. Perez

    Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General of the U.S. Justice Department's civil rights division, speaks at a news conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Thursday Sept. 8, 2011. The 17,000-officer police force in Puerto Rico has unnecessarily injured hundreds of people and killed numerous others, engaging in a longstanding pattern of illegal practices, the Justice Department's civil rights division said Thursday in their report with findings in the pattern or practice investigation involving the Puerto Rico Police Department. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)

  • FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2011 file photo, plain clothes police officers donning bulletproof vests detain a student protestor during a demonstration at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan. The 17,000-officer police force in Puerto Rico has unnecessarily injured hundreds of people and killed numerous others, engaging in a longstanding pattern of illegal practices, the U.S. Justice Department's civil rights division said in a 116-page report released Thursday Sept. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, file)

  • FILE - In this June 30, 2010 file photo, high school student demonstrator Eliza Ramos, left, hangs on to her mother Betty Pena after tear gas was fired by anti-riot police to disperse a student protest against budget cuts in front of the Capitol building in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The 17,000-officer police force in Puerto Rico has unnecessarily injured hundreds of people and killed numerous others, engaging in a longstanding pattern of illegal practices, the U.S. Justice Department's civil rights division said in a 116-page report released Thursday Sept. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, file)