On August 23, 2011, the East Coast was hit with a 5.8 magnitude earthquake at 1:51 pm. The epicenter of the quake was about five miles south of Mineral, Virginia, but the shocks could be felt from Georgia to Canada.

The earthquake caused relatively minimal damage. No deaths were reported, and the only known injuries were minor. Monetarily, the damage was considerably light as well. Although very few people on the East Coast have earthquake insurance (only 5%, by the Washington Post’s assessment), catastrophe risk modelling firm EQUECAT estimated damages from the quake cost less than $100 million.

In fact, some social media users took to Twitter just minutes after the earthquake making light of the event. Once it became clear that there were no deaths or serious damage, memes and jokes surrounding the quake went viral.

That is not to say the event had little impact on East Coast life. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, this was the most intense earthquake since Virginia’s 5.9 magnitude quake in 1897. Important historical sites, such as the Washington National Cathedral and the National Monument, sustained damages. The monument will cost $15 million to repair and probably won't be done until 2014, says USAToday.

Below is a look back at the 2011 East Coast earthquake. Whether you were in New York or Virginia, Georgia or Quebec, that day might still stand out in your mind. Was this your first earthquake? If not, do you remember what your first one was like? Tweet with the hashtag #MyFirstEarthquake to share your experience.

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  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: Morgan Nolan (C) joins other volunteers as they help to restock the shelves at Millers Market after the store was damaged by yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: The chimneys and a portion of the wall are heavily damged on a landmark home in an area known as Cuckoo following yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 near Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: Workers begin repairs on the City Hall building, which is also the local DMV office, after the building was damged by yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: A sign on the door lets customers know the Four Seasons Fitness club was closed after the building was damged by yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: Mike Leman (L) surveys damage to his business after the front wall cracked and moved several inches away from the roof following yesterday's 5.8 earthquake on August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • A damaged spire atop the National Cathed

    A damaged spire atop the National Cathedral is seen on August 23, 2011 in Washington, DC, following an earthquake in the neighboring state of Virginia. One of the strongest earthquakes to strike the US east coast in decades shook downtown Washington Tuesday and sparked evacuations from New York skyscrapers as several states felt the impact. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A damaged spire atop the National Cathed

    A damaged spire atop the National Cathedral is seen on August 23, 2011 in Washington, DC, following an earthquake in the neighboring state of Virginia. One of the strongest earthquakes to strike the US east coast in decades shook downtown Washington Tuesday and sparked evacuations from New York skyscrapers as several states felt the impact. AFP PHOTO/Mandel NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    CUCKOO, VA - AUGUST 23: A statuette at the historic home belonging to Jane and Percy Wootton is shown toppled by the early afternoon 5.8 earthquake whose epicenter was located nearby August 23, 2011 in Cockoo, Virginia. The quake resulted in scattered damage and frayed nerves for residents, but no reported injuries. (Photo by Tom Whitmore/Getty Images)

  • A storefront window is broken from the 5

    A storefront window is broken from the 5.8 earthquake August 23, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. Residents of Mineral were near the epicenter of the earthquake that rattled the East coast of the US. AFP Photo / Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    CUCKOO, VA - AUGUST 23: An historic home belonging to Jane and Percy Wootton is shown damaged by the early afternoon 5.8 earthquake whose epicenter was located nearby August 23, 2011 in Cockoo, Virginia. The quake resulted in scattered damage and frayed nerves for residents, but no reported injuries. (Photo by Tom Whitmore/Getty Images)

  • Dan Lemieux

    FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2011 file photo, Dan Lemieux, manager of the Washington Monument inspection project, holds a loose chunk of marble off the monument damaged by an earthquake Aug. 23 earthquake. Researchers in a nationwide study of earthquakes will soon place new instruments in Georgia and other eastern states as they seek to learn more about what causes them and where they might strike. Scientists involved in the study say the recent earthquake in Virginia, which cracked the Washington Monument, has led to a renewed emphasis on trying to understand more about what lies below the Earth's surface in eastern states. (AP Photo/Ben Nuckols, File)

  • A demolition crew begins the destruction of the Louisa County High School in Mineral, Va., Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. The school was damaged beyond repair during the earthquake last year. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

  • File - In this Aug. 24, 2011 file photo released by the National Park Service, a crack is seen on the west side near the pyramid top of the Washington Monument after a 5.8 magnitude struck the Washington area on Aug. 23. Researchers in a nationwide study of earthquakes will soon place new instruments in Georgia and other eastern states as they seek to learn more about what causes them and where they might strike. Scientists involved in the study say the recent earthquake in Virginia, which cracked the Washington Monument, has led to a renewed emphasis on trying to understand more about what lies below the Earth's surface in eastern states. (AP Photo/U.S. Park Police Aviation Unit, File)

  • A bride in her wedding dress runs from t

    A bride in her wedding dress runs from the courthouse in Lower Manhattan in New York August 23, 2011. One of the strongest earthquakes to strike the US east coast in decades rattled offices Tuesday in downtown Washington and caused panicked evacuations from skyscrapers as far away as New York. The Pentagon, the US Capitol and Union Station in the nation's capital were all evacuated after the 5.9-magnitude quake, which was shallow with its epicenter only 0.6 miles (one kilometer) underground. The disruption to cell phone services in the hour after the quake added to the sense of panic in a country preparing to mark the 10th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. AFP PHOTO/TIMOTHY A.CLARY (Photo credit should read TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Shakes East Coast

    NEW YORK, NY - AUGUST 23: Suzanne Beatty comforts her son Quentin Beatty, 7, on a street in TriBeCa after a 5.8 earthquake struck on August 23, 2011 in New York, United States. The epicenter of the 5.8 earthquake was located near Louisa in central Virginia. Two nuclear power plants at the North Anna Power Station in the same county were reportedly taken offline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

  • Earthquake Strikes East Coast

    A 5.8 magnitude earthquake struck just before two p.m. in Louisa, Virginia -- 83 miles outside of Washington D.C..

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: Merchandise litters the aisles at Millers Market after being knocked from the shelves by yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 24: A faded picture of Jesus hangs behind a window of a storefront shattered by yesterday's 5.8 earthquake August 24, 2011 in Mineral, Virginia. The epicenter of the quake, the East Coast's largest since 1944, was located a few miles outside of Mineral, a town of 430 people located about 50 miles west of Richmond. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 23: Workers survey damage to a chimney after a 5.8 earthquake whose epicenter was located nearby struck early afternoon August 23, 2011 in the small town of Mineral, Viriginia. The quake resulted in scattered damage and frayed nerves for residents, but no reported injuries. (Photo by Tom Whitmore/Getty Images)

  • 5.8 Earthquake Centered In Mineral, Virginia

    MINERAL, VA - AUGUST 23: A chimney is shown damaged by an early afternoon 5.8 earthquake whose epicenter was located nearby August 23, 2011 in the small town of Mineral, Viriginia. The quake resulted in scattered damage and frayed nerves for residents, but no reported injuries. (Photo by Tom Whitmore/Getty Images)

  • A demolition crew begins the destruction of the Louisa County High School in Mineral, Va., Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2012. The school was damaged beyond repair during the earthquake last year. ( AP Photo/Steve Helber)

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