Hurricane Irene hit the outer banks of North Carolina on August 27th, 2011 as a Category 1 hurricane, making it the first of its kind to make landfall since Hurricane Ike in 2008. Much of the East Coast was affected, with 2.3 million people under mandatory evacuation orders and 26 river flooding records broken, according to an NOAA report.

For the first time ever, the New York City subway system shut down due to a natural disaster. Although Massachusetts, Vermont and New Jersey felt the most severe impacts from the storm, according to the National Hurricane Center, many homes and businesses were damaged all along the East Coast, and nearly 9 million people were left without power.

While the storm was not as bad as predicted in some regions, the overall effect of Hurricane Irene was devastating. The National Hurricane Center reports that 49 people were killed as a direct result of the storm, 41 of them in the United States. The damage totaled $15 billion, making Irene the 10th billion dollar disaster in 2011, and the 6th most expensive hurricane in U.S. history. Climate Central notes it was the single most expensive Category 1 hurricane, stealing the title from 1972’s Hurricane Agnes.

Months later, clean up from Irene continued along the coast. While life in some places quickly returned to normal, some lives were irrevocably changed. And with the impact of Tropical Storm Lee only a few days later, the effects of these natural disasters plagued the East Coast for some time.

Here are some stirring images from Hurricane Irene. Were you personally impacted by the storm? Tell us your experience in the comments below.

Loading Slideshow...
  • NAGS HEAD, NC - AUGUST 28: Billy Stinson (L) comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, North Carolina. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed yesterday by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Roanoke Soundin Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. 'We were pretending, just for a moment, that the cottage was still behind us and we were just sitting there watching the sunset,' said Erin afterward. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • A piano chair hangs from the ceiling in the home of Martha Gordon as she looks through her home destroyed during the flood in the aftermath of Hurricane Irene, Monday, Sept. 26, 2011, in Wayne, N.J. The chair, which was on top of a piano, was lodged into the ceiling when the Ramapo River crested sending floodwaters into the residence. Gordon, who has lived at the house for 50 years, says she has given up and will be tearing the house and moving to Maine. She has talked to FEMA, but doesn't expect any quick relief aid. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • In this Aug. 28, 2011 file photo, officials survey the damage to route 12 on Hatteras Island, NC. Hurricane Irene swept through the area cutting the roadway in five locations. Irene caused more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast to reportedly lose power over the weekend, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

  • An excavator moves a mountain of debris outside the state office buildings on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Waterbury, Vt. The Vermont State Office Complex was rendered unusable for several weeks because of the flooding from the remnants of Hurricane irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • NAGS HEAD, NC - AUGUST 28: Billy Stinson (L) is comforted by Lisa Morrisette while he sits next to a pile of debris that was once his cottage August 28, 2011 in Nags Head, North Carolina. The cottage, built in 1903 and destroyed yesterday by Hurricane Irene, was one of the first vacation cottages built on Roanoke Soundin Nags Head. Stinson has owned the home, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, since 1963. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

  • In this Sept. 2, 2011 photo, a front loader passes a sink hole in a Millburn, N.J. intersection. Officials say it could take months just to make basic repairs due to damage caused by Hurricane Irene. Many permanent fixes will have to wait until the spring. (AP Photo/Chris Hawley)

  • The debris of a storm-ravaged home is piled up in Columbia, N.C., Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, after Hurricane Irene move through the area last week. Irene has been blamed for at least 46 deaths in 13 states and knocked out power to millions. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)

  • A United States flag hangs near a washed out section of US 4 in Killington, Vt, in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011. Running low on food and money, Vermont residents stranded by flooded roads relied upon provisions dropped by National Guard troops to get by Wednesday while the rest of the East Coast labored to recover from the wrath of the hurricane-turned-tropical storm known as Irene. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • A home is inundated with floodwaters in Creswell, N.C., Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, after Hurricane Irene move through the area last week. Irene has been blamed for at least 46 deaths in 13 states and knocked out power to millions. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)

  • In this Aug. 27, 2011 file photo, one of two people rescued from a sailboat, right, uses a line to make their way onto the beach on Willoughby Spit in Norfolk, Va., after a couple and their cat were rescued from the boat that foundered in the waters of the Chesapeake Bay battered by winds from Hurricane Irene. Nature is pummeling the United States in 2011 with extremes. There have been more than 700 U.S. disaster and weather deaths. What's happening, say experts, is mostly random chance or the bad luck of getting the wrong roll of the dice. However, there is something more to it, many of them say. Man-made global warming is loading the dice to increase our odds of getting the bad roll. (AP Photo/TheVirginian-Pilot, Bill Tiernan, File)

  • A pedestrian footbridge built by residents of Rochester, Vt., is shown Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, to replace a bridge that was washed out by hurricane-turned-tropical-storm Irene. Three days after the remnants of Irene deluged Vermont, this little town in the Green Mountains remained in the dark and unplugged Wednesday, its 1,000 residents leaning on each other _ and waiting. For food, for lights, for Internet connections, for telephones, for roads safe enough to drive in and out. (AP Photo/John Curran)

  • Homes sit in muddy water Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, in Bloomingdale, N.J., as areas of northern New Jersey are still flooded as a result of Hurricane Irene. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • New Hampshire Gov. John Lynch meets with officials from the state's Department of Transportation on the Kancamagus Highway that cuts through the White Mountain National Forest, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, in Lincoln, N.H. Flash floods from Hurricane Irene washed out part of the road. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • This file combination of two satellite images provided by GeoEye shows, above, an area of Hatteras Island, N.C., which includes a view of Highway 12 through the center of the frame, taken on Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011, after Hurricane Irene hit the Island on Aug. 27, and, below, the same area of Hatteras Island taken on June 12, 2011, before the island was cut off from the mainland after Hurricane Irene tore up several segments of Highway 12. Even some groups dependent on tourism are questioning Dare County

  • A mountain of debris sits outside the state office buildings on Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 in Waterbury, Vt. The Vermont State Office Complex was rendered unusable for several weeks because of the flooding from the remnants of Hurricane irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Monday Aug. 29, 2011 photo, Teo Campbell stands on what used to be the bottom of the Bartonsville Covered Bridge over the Williams River in a field along the river in Rockingham, Vt. downstream from its original location after heavy rains from Hurricane Irene tore the bridge out. If you had to choose one symbol that sums up the state's essence, it might well be the covered bridge. Besides being tourist magnets, the bridges embody a reverence for history and the rural landscape, a prized sense of community. But the spans are vulnerable. Until Irene hit on Aug. 28, Vermont still had 101; the storm destroyed two and damaged 13 others. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • Zerega's Pizzaria suffered major damage from the flood cause by Tropical Storm Irene, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 in Windham, N.Y. Officials say more than a dozen towns in Vermont and at least three in New York are cut off, with roads and bridges washed out by flooding caused by the remnants of Hurricane Irene. In New York, the towns of Keene in the Adirondacks, and Windham and Phoenicia in the Catskills are effectively isolated by damage to roads and bridges. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

  • A mobile home frame is wrapped around a tree in Columbia , N.C., Friday, Sept. 2, 2011, after Hurricane Irene moved through the area last week. Irene has been blamed for at least 46 deaths in 13 states and knocked out power to millions. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)

  • Christopher Cobb

    Christopher Cobb of Samaritan's Purse removes tree limbs as part of hurricane relief in Askewville, N.C., Friday, Sept. 2 2011 a week after Hurricane Irene hit the area. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)

  • In this Aug. 29, 2011 file photo, rescue workers pull a boat with a woman as they wade through floodwaters caused by Hurricane Irene, in Pompton Lakes, N.J. Forecast to be the biggest in decades to hit the Eastern Seaboard, Irene triggered evacuations, airport closures and the unprecedented shutdown of New York's mass transit system. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

  • In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011 photo, businesses sit in muddy water alongside the Passaic River in Woodland Park, N.J., as areas of northern New Jersey are still flooded as a result of Hurricane Irene. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

  • David Parker, a farmer in Craven County, N.C., walks through his tobacco damaged by Hurricane Irene on Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011. His crew was in a race to salvage the tatters of what was weeks away from being the best tobacco harvest of his life. State officials are still toting up the losses, but expect that most of the $750 million, main-money crop, will be lost to the Hurricane. (AP Photo/The News & Observer, Takaaki Iwabu)

  • Ron Corsi walks through the basement of his house, which has been without power since Hurricane Irene struck the area, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, in Havertown, Pa. More than 130,000 customers are still without power across Pennsylvania as the state continues to deal with the aftermath of the storm. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

  • Martha Gordon carefully steps through the destroyed hardwood floors of her home damaged during the floods caused by Hurricane Irene, Monday, Sept. 26, 2011, in Wayne, N.J. Gordon, who has lived at the house for 50 years, says she has given up and will be tearing the house down and moving to Maine. She has talked to FEMA, but doesn't expect any quick relief aid. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • In this Monday Aug. 29, 2011 photo, the remains of the Bartonsville Covered Bridge over the Williams River lie in Rockingham, Vt. in a field along the river downstream from its original location after heavy rains from Hurricane Irene tore the bridge out. If you had to choose one symbol that sums up the state's essence, it might well be the covered bridge. Besides being tourist magnets, the bridges embody a reverence for history and the rural landscape, a prized sense of community. But the spans are vulnerable. Until Irene hit on Aug. 28, Vermont still had 101; the storm destroyed two and damaged 13 others. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

  • In a Thursday, Sept. 8, 2011 file photo, a sign reading "make an offer" hangs from a tree near items from a home damaged during floods caused by Hurricane Irene, in Pompton Lakes, N.J. after the remnants of Tropical Storm Lee dumped more rain across the Northeast, closing major highways and socking areas still recovering from Hurricane Irene. The 2011 Atlantic hurricane season, which ended Wednesday, Nov. 30, was a study in contradictions: It spared the usual Southern targets while Irene paralyzed the East coast and devastated the upper reaches of New England with deadly flooding. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

  • In this Tuesday Dec. 6, 2011 photo, significant damage remains from Hurricane Irene along N.C. 12 entering Rodanthe, N.C. Scores of residents attended a Bonner Bridge - Phase II Public Workshop Tuesday evening at the local community center to learn about plans for repairing the damage. Hundreds were stranded when Hurricane Irene sliced through Hatteras island in August. It took days to establish an emergency ferry route, which ran around the clock from Rodanthe to Stumpy Point on the Dare County mainland until the new bridge opened Oct. 10. (Stephen M. Katz/The Virginian-Pilot)

  • In this Aug. 28, 2011 file photo, residents of South Windsor, Conn., look over downed wires and utility poles toppled by Tropical Storm Irene. A review of state regulatory reports by The Associated Press shows the problems that arose after Irene and a freak end-of-October snowstorm are similar to those that cropped up after other major storms, dating back to Hurricane Gloria in 1985. (AP Photo/Journal Inquirer, Jim Michaud, File)

  • In a Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011 file photo, a ferry boat leaves a dock in Stumpy Point, N.C., carrying some of the Hatteras Island residents, during he first phase of a staged re-entry.

  • In this April 2, 2012 photo, Marty Navojosky walks amid debris on his property that was left behind from flooding of the Schoharie Creek caused by Hurricane Irene, in Charleston, N.Y. More than seven months after the storm deluged the region, streams and river banks are still being cleared of debris and tapped-out local governments are looking for more help to finish the job.

  • Empty shelfs are seen at the Community Food Bank of New Jersey's warehouse, Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2011, in Hillside, N.J. The food bank's supplies are depleted because of the needs of communities across Northern New Jersey following Hurricane Irene and a rare October snow storm. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • This Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011 file photo shows a flooded road on Hatteras Island, N.C., after Hurricane Irene swept through the area the previous day cutting the roadway in five locations. From Cape Hatteras, N.C., to just north of Boston, sea levels are rising much faster than they are around the globe, putting one of the world's most costly coasts in danger of flooding, according to a new study published Sunday, June 24, 2012, in the journal Nature Climate Change. By the year 2100, scientists and computer models estimate that sea levels globally could rise as much as 3.3 feet. The accelerated rate along the East Coast could add about another 8 to 11 inches, Asbury Sallenger Jr., an oceanographer for the USGS said. "Where that kind of thing becomes important is during a storm," Sallenger said. That's when it can damage buildings and erode coastlines. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds)

  • Firefighters build a temporary Emergency Services building in a trailer next to City Hall as more rain and flooding are expected in the weather forecast after Tropical Storm Irene in Prattsville, N.Y., Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. East Coast residents recovering from Hurricane Irene were stuck under the chugging remnants of Tropical Storm Lee Wednesday, some of them preparing to move to higher ground yet again as rivers rose. (AP Photo / Hans Pennink)

  • Kathy Toranzo, left, and J.D. King prepare for a voluntary evacuation after more rain and flooding in the weather forecast after Tropical Storm Irene in Prattsville, N.Y., Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011. Northeastern residents still weary from the flooding wrought by Hurricane Irene braced Wednesday for the leftovers of Tropical Storm Lee. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)

  • President Barack Obama walks down Fayette Avenue as he visits flood damage caused by Hurricane Irene in Wayne, N.J., Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Water logged furniture and other personal belongings sit in front of a home on Riverside Drive in Wayne, N.J., Tuesday Sept. 6, 2011. Hurricane Irene caused massive flooding in many northern New Jersey communities affecting many Latino residents. (AP Photo/Rich Schultz)

  • Eight-year-old twins Amanda Heaslip, center, and Brianna Heaslip, right, hug their father Jason Heaslip, as he and his wife Angela are interviewed by The Associated Press in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011, in Killington, Vt. Running low on food and money, Vermont residents stranded by flooded roads relied upon provisions dropped by National Guard troops to get by Wednesday while the rest of the East Coast labored to recover from the wrath of the hurricane-turned-tropical storm known as Irene. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

  • Heavy machinery dumps tons of sand onto the beach in Brigantine, NJ on Monday Oct. 3, 2011. The Jersey shore community just outside Atlantic City suffered serious erosion to its beaches from Hurricane Irene. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

  • Vermont National Guard emergency airlift unloads supplies for the isolated town of Rochester, Vt., where civilians help unload the cargo, Wednesday Aug. 31, 2011. About 2 million people remained without power in water-logged homes and businesses from North Carolina through New England, where hurricane-turned-tropical-storm Irene has been blamed for at least 45 deaths in 13 states. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)

  • Marty Navojosky

    In this April 2, 2012 photo, Marty Navojosky, framed in the windshield of his Willys Jeep, walks amid debris on his property that was left behind from flooding of the Schoharie Creek caused by Hurricane Irene, in Charleston, N.Y. More than seven months after the storm deluged the region, streams and river banks are still being cleared of debris and tapped-out local governments are looking for more help to finish the job.