There have been many consequences of the War on Drugs. One has been the explosion of violence in Mexico. For journalists, the war has been particularly vicious.

In Mexico, as in the U.S., the response to drugs has been a violent and aggressive one. The American government has given the Mexican government billions of dollars to help carry out the war since it was launched in 2006. Since then, around 50,000 people are commonly thought to have died, and the cartels appear more powerful than ever. Activists say that demand in the U.S. has helped fuel the rise of drug cartels back home.

There are no firm numbers on how many Mexican journalists have been killed. The Committee to Protect Journalists put the toll at 45 in May. The Mexican government put it at 67 in July. Other estimates spiral even higher.

It's not hard to see why journalists have become such a target. Journalists always become a target in one way or another — their job, after all, is often to uncover things people don't want uncovered. In Mexico, though, the reprisals have been spectacularly brutal.

A review of the last year alone is terrifying:

One paper was forced to stop covering certain stories after its offices were hit by grenades twice.

A reporter was murdered and found stuffed in a garbage bag.

Another was first kidnapped and then murdered.

Another was shot to death inside his house. His wife and son were also killed.

Three more were also found dismembered in garbage bags, with signs they had been tortured.

Another was found in her home, with evidence of asphyxiation and blows to her body.

That is just the tip of the iceberg. There are countless other stories like these.

And yet, journalism is still happening in Mexico. If reporters can be uncommonly targeted for what they do, they can also be uncommonly brave. Sandra Rodriguez, a reporter in Juarez, is a good example. She spoke to NPR in June and said that, after some of her newspaper colleagues were murdered, "We were more angry than scared." Instead of shrinking away, Rodriguez redoubled her efforts, and began investigating some of the crime taking place around her.

"I didn’t want any foreign reporter to tell me the story of my city," she said.

HuffPost Live will be taking a comprehensive look at America’s failed war on drugs Aug. 28 and Sept. 4 from 12-4 p.m. EDT and 6-10 p.m. EDT. Click here to check it out -- and join the conversation.

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  • Relatives and friends of Mexican journal

    Relatives and friends of Mexican journalist Victor Baez attend his funeral, in Xalapa, Veracruz State, Mexico on June 15, 2012. Baez's body was located yesterday in the center of the city of Xalapa, in the State of Veracruz, the most dangerous condition for the exercise of journalism in Mexico with nine journalists killed since 2011. AFP PHOTO/SERGIO HERNANDEZ (Photo credit should read Sergio Hernandez Vega/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Relatives and friends of Mexican journal

    Relatives and friends of Mexican journalist Victor Baez carry his coffin during his funeral, in Xalapa, Veracruz State, Mexico on June 15, 2012. Baez's body was located yesterday in the center of the city of Xalapa, in the State of Veracruz, the most dangerous condition for the exercise of journalism in Mexico with nine journalists killed since 2011. AFP PHOTO/SERGIO HERNANDEZ (Photo credit should read Sergio Hernandez Vega/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A woman stands next to the coffin of Mex

    A woman stands next to the coffin of Mexican journalist Regina Martinez, in Xalapa, Veracruz State, Mexico, on April 29, 2012. Martinez was found dead in her house last April 28, with signs of strangulation. More than 40,000 people have been killed in rising drug-related violence in Mexico since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed soldiers and federal police to take on organized crime. AFP PHOTO/SERGIO HERNANDEZ (Photo credit should read SERGIO HERNANDEZ/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Journalists and students protest the mur

    Journalists and students protest the murder of Mexican journalist Regina Martinez, in Xalapa, Veracruz State, Mexico, on April 29, 2012. Martinez was founded dead in her house last April 28, with signs of strangulation. More than 40,000 people have been killed in rising drug-related violence in Mexico since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed soldiers and federal police to take on organized crime. AFP PHOTO/SERGIO HERNANDEZ (Photo credit should read SERGIO HERNANDEZ/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Journalists and students protest the mur

    Journalists and students protest the murder of Mexican journalist Regina Martinez, in Xalapa, Veracruz State, Mexico, on April 29, 2012. Martinez was founded dead in her house last April 28, with signs of strangulation. More than 40,000 people have been killed in rising drug-related violence in Mexico since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon deployed soldiers and federal police to take on organized crime. AFP PHOTO/SERGIO HERNANDEZ (Photo credit should read SERGIO HERNANDEZ/AFP/GettyImages)

  • Picture taken on September 24, 2011 of a

    Picture taken on September 24, 2011 of a notice attributed to an organized crime gang which was left next to the decapitated body of Maria Elizabeth Macias, the 39-year-old chief editor of the newspaper Primera Hora who was found on Saturday in Nuevo Laredo, in northeastern Mexico near the US border. The message was signed with the letter 'Z' usually associated with the Zetas drug gang, who started as ex-elite army officers working as hitmen for the Gulf cartel in the 1990s and are blamed for many violent attacks in Tamaulipas. AFP PHOTO/STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

  • People hold signs during a protest again

    People hold signs during a protest against violence towards journalists in Mexico, on September 11, 2011, in Mexico City. More than 60 journalists have been killed in Mexico during the last decade, many of them by drug traffickers. AFP PHOTO/Ronaldo Schemidt (Photo credit should read Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexican journalists march during a prote

    Mexican journalists march during a protest against violence towards journalists in Mexico, on September 11, 2011, in Mexico City. More than 60 journalists have been killed in Mexico during the last decade, many of them by drug traffickers. AFP PHOTO/Ronaldo Schemidt (Photo credit should read Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A woman cries over the coffin of journal

    A woman cries over the coffin of journalist Ana Maria Marcela Yarce Viveros during her funeral in Mexico City on September 2, 2011. The bodies of Yarce Viveros, of the weekly magazine Contralinea and Rocio Gonzalez Trapaga, a freelance former reporter of Televisa channel, were found on September 1 killed by asphyxiation and their bodies left naked with their hands and feet bound in Mexico City. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Mexican poet and journalist Javier Sicil

    Mexican poet and journalist Javier Sicilia (C) --whose son Juan Francisco Sicilia (24) was murdered on March 27-- and other activists, walk during the last of a four-day silent march to protest drug violence --which has left tens of thousands dead-- and the military strategy that has failed to stop it, in Mexico City, on May 8, 2011. The marchers set off last May 5 from the city of Cuernavaca, a popular weekend retreat some 55 miles (90 km) south from the capital, and it is due to end with a massive demonstration in the Zocalo, the main square of Mexico City. AFP PHOTO/Ronaldo Schemidt (Photo credit should read Ronaldo Schemidt/AFP/Getty Images)