RANDOLPH, Vt. (AP) — For some state residents, it's block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. For still others, just another day of cleaning up the mess.

But one of the most unifying events was probably the sound of church and town hall bells reverberating simultaneously through the mountain valleys that Hurricane Irene's floodwaters shredded a year ago.

Gov. Peter Shumlin called for the bell-ringing commemoration as residents reflected Tuesday on how far the state has come since the remnants of Irene unleashed the worst flooding in recent memory, killing six people, wiping out hundreds of homes and businesses and cutting off towns with miles of wiped-out roads and dozens of destroyed bridges.

At the Bethany United Church on Randolph's Main Street the church bell rang at 7 p.m., while across the street at Chandler Music Hall hundreds of people gathered to commemorate Tropical Storm Irene, celebrate the recovery work that's been done and recommit themselves to the work that remains to do.

Inside the hall, Shumlin, the state's congressional delegation and other dignitaries gathered to thank the thousands of volunteers who responded to the storm.

Many residents are still hurting, Shumlin said. Some are still waiting for the Federal Emergency Management Agency "to tell them something they can believe," he said.

The landlocked state suffered the worst damage along Irene's trail of destruction, which left more than 65 people dead from the Caribbean to Canada. Cars tumbling like toys in roiling waters and covered bridges crumbling against muddy waves remain among the most indelible images of the storm.

Shumlin spent Tuesday on the last leg of a four-day tour of 22 Vermont communities hit hard by the storm. In Waitsfield, he joined townspeople for an impromptu midday celebration of the remarkable resurgence that has occurred since floodwaters from the Mad River severely damaged roads and buildings in the historic village.

Outside a new restaurant opening this week where one was flooded out by Irene, Shumlin praised all the work done but said some residents still need their neighbors' help recovering from the storm.

"Reach out to the people you know still are hurting, knock on their door and say, 'I am here to help,'" the governor said.

The fact that people are still hurting is obvious at businesses such as the White River Valley Campground in Stockbridge, where owners Rebecca and Drew Smith say they're still overwhelmed by all the work needed to get the place back open.

"We need contractors, we need electricians, we need plumbers," Rebecca Smith said.

But the couple said they have no means to pay for all that's needed. They've been out of business since the storm and have missed their mortgage payments the past two months.

It's easy to see by walking around the campsites by the placid White River, and through the rustic recreation hall, why the campground drew some families to come back every year for decades.

But now the grounds are covered in silt, the root balls of upended birches and junk — some of it was the Smiths'; the rest was deposited on their property when the river turned to a raging torrent.

Janet Lumbra, a 37-year-old single mother from East Granville, said she planned to observe the anniversary by continuing to work on fixing up her flood-gutted home. She and her 16-year-old son, Riley, lived in a camper across the road for months after the storm. But winter set in, and it got too expensive — $255 a week — to run the generator that powered the camper's heater, so they moved in with Lumbra's sister. They went back to the camper in the spring.

"I can't cry anymore about this. Now you got to be a big girl and pull strings and try to get (things) done. That's what I've been doing, contacting everybody and trying to get the ball rolling," Lumbra said.

While some still struggle, others are celebrating the progress made — even in places where there's much more to do.

In Newfane, in southern Vermont, where the Rock River wrought extensive damage, residents held a celebratory parade and barbecue Sunday. The parade started at the rubble pile on the Dover Road, where a house had stood before Irene.

Gloria Cristelli, the Newfane town clerk, a town board member and president of the Southeastern Vermont Watershed Alliance, marched with a toy singing fish she had bought at a flea market that morning.

"Yes we've still got work to do ... but we've come a long way in a year, and we did want to celebrate that," she said.

Some observances contained a somber element. Asah Rowles, board chairwoman of Mad River Flood Recovery, said people in her area were planning a moment of silence Tuesday evening after 30 seconds of town hall and church bells ringing around the state at 7 p.m., as called for by Shumlin.

Immediately following the bell-ringing, a focal point for the anniversary was to be the Chandler Music Hall in Randolph, with music and storm videos among the attractions.

At Deerfield Academy just over the border in Deerfield, Mass., 7 p.m. Tuesday also was the start time for a concert of specially written Irene-themed songs, being put on as a fundraiser for the Connecticut River Watershed Council.

Waterbury is featuring locally produced art about Irene and the recovery at a special exhibition that began Saturday and runs throughout September.

Observances continue into September, with a tour of Killington and other towns that suffered damage set for Sept. 3 and Waitsfield playing host to a block party Sept. 8.

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  • Tom Scorsone

    In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., Tom Scorsone, of the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department, works on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this file photo of Aug. 28, 2011, a man surveys the floodwaters on Manhattan's West Side after Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, hit New York. Two years before Irene created the prospect of a flooding nightmare in New York City, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: Massive, moveable barriers to shield the city from a storm-stirred sea.(AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)

  • n this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., crews from the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department work on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, people near New York's Brooklyn Bridge wade through floodwaters brought on by Hurricane Irene, which weakened to a tropical storm just before hitting New York's Coney Island. Two years prior to Irene, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: massive, moveable barriers to shield New York City from a storm-stirred sea. The network would protect Manhattan and parts of the four outer boroughs and New Jersey, but not some vulnerable swaths of Brooklyn and Queens. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

  • In this photo taken Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2012, in Totowa, N.J., crews from the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission's River Restoration Department work on cleaning up debris out of the Passaic River. Flooding caused Irene, which hit New Jersey with tropical storm strength in 2011, forced blockage along the river as it swept through communities along the Passaic river. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2011, file photo, waves crash against the Steel Pier in Atlantic City, N.J. as Hurricane Irene approached the northeast. Two years before Irene, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: Massive, moveable barriers to shield New York City from a storm-stirred sea. One strategy entailed an estimated $9.1 billion set of barriers at three critical points around the city's waterways. The network would protect Manhattan and parts of the four outer boroughs and New Jersey, but not some vulnerable swaths of Brooklyn and Queens. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, waves crash into the pier at Brooklyn's Coney Island as Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, approaches New York. Irene proved not to be the catastrophe forecasters feared in the city, but in the wake of last year's near-miss, elected officials and community groups are pressing for an evaluation of whether sea barriers make sense for New York, and the city has been gathering information, while stressing that the barriers represent only one of many ideas under study.(AP Photo/Craig Ruttle, File)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, a biker makes his way around a taxi stranded in floodwaters of Hurricane Irene, downgraded to a tropical storm, in New York. Two years before Irene created the prospect of a flooding nightmare in New York City, 100 scientists and engineers met to sketch out a bold defense: massive, moveable barriers to shield the city from a storm-stirred sea.(AP Photo/Peter Morgan, File)

  • In this March 20, 2012, file photo, silt from Tropical Storm Irene covers a farmers' field Tuesday, March 20, 2012 in Waitsfield, Vt. A year after Hurricane Irene tore through farms from North Carolina to Vermont, some farmers are still grappling with the aftermath. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, farmer's fields are flooded from Tropical Storm Irene in this aerial view on Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2011 in Rutland, Vt. A year after Hurricane Irene tore through farms from North Carolina to Vermont, some farmers are still grappling with the aftermath. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, water covers Main St. in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene in Waterbury, Vt. Vermont has become a national leader in how to respond to natural disasters, Gov. Peter Shumlin says, and there's little he'd change about the state's handling of flooding after Irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2011, file photo, an excavator works in the White River in Stockbridge, Vt. Tropical Storm Irene had a major effect on Vermont,s rivers. Hurricane Irene and its remnants raked the Caribbean, the eastern U.S. and Canada for more than a week a year ago. Though it never hit the U.S. as anything stronger than a minimal hurricane, it ranks among the costliest in history, causing more than $5.3 billion in damage, and killed at least 67 people in all. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, a sign remembers Tropical storm Irene in East Granville, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by the storm. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, workers begin repair to damage by Tropical Storm Irene on U.S. Route 4 in Mendon, Vt. Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin hailed the reopening of U.S Route 4 in such a short time. Vermont has become a national leader in how to respond to natural disasters, Gov. Peter Shumlin says, and there's little he'd change about the state's handling of flooding after Irene. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE-In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, Nina Brennan, right, and Phyllis Berry clean mud from in front of the Proud Flower store in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene in Waterbury, Vt. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE -In this Oct. 31, 2011, file photo, a mobile home sits partially demolished by Tropical Storm Irene in Berlin, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by the storm. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, Janet Lumbra stands outside the recreational trailer where she lives in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever.

  • FILE-In this Aug. 28, 2011, file photo, rescue personnel bring stranded residents to shore in Montpelier, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, the destroyed home of Janet Lumbra is seen in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever.

  • FILE-In this Aug. 30, 2011, file photo, destruction on Route 4 from Tropical Storm Irene is seen in Killington, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2011, file photo, people walk along a washed out section of Route 12 in Berlin, Vt. A year ago, Vermont was devastated by Tropical Storm Irene. Hard lessons have been learned in the year since Irene sent sedans bobbing down rivers, swept away historic covered bridges, put millions in the dark and killed more than 65 people all along the Eastern Seaboard. Responses range from personal gestures, like buying a home generator, to statewide policy changes, like the tightening of utility regulations. Many of the reactions are based on the belief that while Irene surprised areas more used to blizzards than tropical weather, future storms are inevitable. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, damage from Tropical Storm Irene is seen in Woodlawn Cemetery in Rochester, Vt. A year after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene washed 50 graves from their resting places, progress is slow toward repairing Woodlawn Cemetery and rebuiring dozens of sets of remains washed into the open.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, burial vaults are lined up in Woodlawn Cemetery in Rochester, Vt. A year after flooding from Tropical Storm Irene washed 50 graves from their resting places, progress is slow toward repairing Woodlawn Cemetery and rebuiring dozens of sets of remains washed into the open.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • In this Aug. 17, 2012 photo, Janet Lumbra looks over the remains of her home in East Granville, Vt. For some, there will be block parties and parades. For others, a moment of silence. Or it might be just another day of struggling to clean up the mess. But if there's one unifying event to mark the first anniversary of Irene, it'll probably be the 30 seconds of ringing of bells in churches and town halls across Vermont that Gov. Peter Shumlin has requested for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 28, 2012, a year to the day after the storm changed Vermont forever. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • Mike Parillo

    Mike Parillo, a volunteer at the Walter Elwood Museum , looks over items and records that were save and restored following flooding from last year's Hurricane Irene are on display on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Amsterdam, N.Y. The flooding damaged about 40 state parks and historic sites, including sand erosion at Long Island's Jones Beach, miles of toppled trees, and a destroyed water main at Bear Mountain in the Hudson Valley. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Items that were saved at the Walter Elwood Museum and restored following flooding from Hurricane Irene are on display on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Amsterdam, N.Y. The flooding damaged about 40 state parks and historic sites, including sand erosion at Long Island's Jones Beach, miles of toppled trees, and a destroyed water main at Bear Mountain in the Hudson Valley.(AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • Alessa Wylie

    Alessa Wylie, director of Old Fort Johnson, stands in a hallway at the museum while showing off restoration work done there after damage caused by flooding from Hurricane Irene last year, on Thursday, Aug. 16, 2012, in Fort Johnson, N.Y. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)

  • In this Aug. 28, 2011 photo, a flooded road is seen in Hatteras Island, N.C., after Hurricane Irene swept through the area Saturday cutting the roadway in five locations. Irene caused more than 4.5 million homes and businesses along the East Coast to reportedly lose power over the weekend, and at least 11 deaths were blamed on the storm. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

  • Sandy Gaffney reflects in her new trailer home on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 in Berlin, Vt. Gaffney lost the first home she ever owned when Tropical Storm Irene hit her mobile home park less than a year after she moved in. After months of struggle, bonding with and helping other flood victims, and speaking out, she's moved back in the Weston's Mobile Home Park, into a renovated trailer, and turned into an activist.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • New trailer homes are seen at Weston's Mobile Home Park on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2012 in Berlin, Vt. Sandy Gaffney lost the first home she ever owned when Tropical Storm Irene hit her mobile home park less than a year after she moved in. After months of struggle, bonding with and helping other flood victims, and speaking out, she's moved back in the Weston's Mobile Home Park, into a renovated trailer, and turned into an activist.(AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

  • FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2011 file photo, crews from Connecticut Light and Power replace a damaged transformer in East Windsor, Conn., in the aftermath of Tropical Storm Irene. The Public Utilities Regulatory Authority said Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012, it will consider reducing the allowed profit for CL&P as a penalty for the way the utility handled power outages during storms in August and October 2011. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)

  • Workers install a foundation at a house that was damaged after flooding caused by Tropical Storm Irene on Thursday, Aug. 23, 2012, in Prattsville, N.Y. Hurricane Irene was trumpeted as a potentially huge disaster that could wipe out New York City. It initially underwhelmed but then stalked inland and tore apart a landlocked state. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)