FORT HOOD, Texas — The Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly Fort Hood shooting rampage told a judge Thursday that he grew a beard because his Muslim faith requires it, not as a show of disrespect.

Speaking in court for the first time since showing up with a beard in violation of Army regulations in June, Maj. Nidal Hasan responded to Col. Gregory Gross when the judge asked why he had the beard.

"In the name of almighty Allah, I am a Muslim," Hasan said. "I believe my religion requires me to wear a beard."

The pretrial hearing was the first since a military appeals court stopped proceedings Aug. 15 to consider the dispute over Hasan's beard less than a week before his court-martial was to begin. Gross held Hasan in contempt of court and fined him $1,000 for a sixth time Thursday, and again sent him to a nearby room to watch the rest of the proceedings on closed-circuit television.

"I am not trying to disrespect your authority as a judge," Hasan said before his latest removal from the courtroom.

"When I stand before God, I am individually responsible for my actions," he said, apparently referring to the beard.

Hasan faces the death penalty if convicted in the November 2009 attack that killed 13 and wounded more than two dozen others on the Texas Army post.

Gross, who has said he would order Hasan to be forcibly shaved before the trial if he did not get rid of the beard himself, said Thursday that he will order a forcible shaving next week. That will delay the case again because Hasan's attorneys can appeal before a decision is made on whether he'll be forcibly shaved, Gross said.

Earlier this week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces ruled that Hasan's appeal was premature because Gross has not issued a definitive order for Hasan to be forcibly shaved. The court said that if Gross issues that order, he must address several issues, including whether the Religious Freedom Restoration Act applies in the court-martial. Some witnesses for prosecutors and defense attorneys may testify at another pretrial hearing at Fort Hood next week to address those issues.

Hasan's attorneys have argued that forcing him to shave would violate his religious freedoms. They also have said Hasan wouldn't shave because he had a premonition that his death is imminent, and doesn't want to die beardless because he believes not having one is a sin.

According to military regulations, soldiers who disobey orders to be clean-shaven can be forcibly shaved.

Gross has said he wants Hasan in the courtroom during the court-martial to prevent a possible appeal over the beard if Hasan is convicted.

Hasan is paralyzed from the waist down after being shot by police on the day of the rampage, but appears to have full use of his arms.

Prosecutors have said they don't believe that religion is Hasan's motive, noting he was clean-shaven at the time of the shootings.

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  • Nidal Hasan

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriff's Department via The Temple Daily Telegram shows Nidal Hasan, the Army psychiatrist charged in the deadly 2009 Fort Hood shooting. Hasan should be forced to shave his beard to avoid any potential jury bias in his pending murder trial, say some military experts and the judge overseeing his pending court-martial. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriff's Department via The Temple Daily Telegram, File)

  • Nidal Hasan

    FILE - An April 9, 2010 file photo provided by the Bell County Sheriffs Department, shows U.S. Maj. Nidal Hasan at the San Antonio to Bell County Jail in Belton, Texas. Judge, Col. Gregory Gross, is to decide at a pretrial hearing Tuesday Aug. 14, 2012, whether to delay the trial of Hasan. (AP Photo/Bell County Sheriffs Department, File)

  • Nidal Malik Hasan

    FILE - The 2007 file photo provided by the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS) shows Nidal Malik Hasan when he undertook the Disaster and Military Psychiatry Fellowship program. Hasan is charged in the fatal 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood which killed 13 people and injured more that 30 others. He faces the death penalty if convicted. (AP Photo/Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    Maj. Laura Suttinger of the 467th Combat Stress Control Detachment shows a bracelet at a press conference Saturday, Oct. 30, 2010, in Madison, Wis. The bracelet commemorates soldiers who were killed on Nov. 5, 2009, at Fort Hood in Killeen, Texas, during a shooting rampage suspect Maj. Nidal Hasan. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2009 file photo, the entrance to Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, near Killeen is seen. Eighty-three victims and family members in the worst mass shooting ever at a U.S. military installation are seeking $750 million in compensation from the Army, alleging that willful negligence enabled psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan to carry out a terrorist attack at Fort Hood, Texas. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett, File)

  • Shawn Manning

    In this Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, photo, retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Shawn Manning poses for a photo, at his home in Lacey, Wash., as he holds a memorial bracelet for members of his military unit who were killed in a 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. Manning, who still carries two bullets in his body from the shooting that killed 13 people, is scheduled to testify at the court martial for Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the accused shooter this week. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • Shawn Manning

    In this Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, photo, retired U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Shawn Manning poses for a photo, at his home in Lacey, Wash. as he holds a photograph from the memorial for victims of a 2009 mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. Manning, who still carries two bullets in his body from the shooting that killed 13 people, is scheduled to testify at the court martial for Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the accused shooter this week. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

  • Kathy Platoni

    File - In this Nov. 1, 2010 file photo from Beaver Creek Ohio, U.S. Army Col. Kathy Platoni talks of the Fort Hood, Texas shooting that took 13 lives and wounded more than 30 others. After years of delays, Platoni will come face to face with Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, the man accused of the 2009 shooting rampage. (AP Photo/Al Behrman, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    This handout photo courtesy of Eduardo Caraveo show Maj Libardo Eduardo Caraveo, who was killed during a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas on Nov. 5, 2009. A trial for Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is charged in the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded, starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Courtesy of Eduardo Caraveo)

  • John Gaffaney

    File - This undated file photo provided by the Gaffaney family shows John Gaffaney, who was killed during a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas on Nov. 5, 2009. A trial for Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is charged in the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded, starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Gaffaney Family)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    This handout photo courtesy of Keely Vanacker shows Mike Cahill who was killed during a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas on Nov. 5, 2009. A trial for Maj. Nidal Hasan, who is charged in the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded, starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. (AP Photo/Keely Vanacker)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE - This file combination image shows handout photos of the victims killed during the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas. From top left, Michael Grant Cahill, 62, of Cameron, Texas; Maj. Libardo Eduardo Caraveo, 52, of Woodbridge, Va.; Staff Sgt. Justin M. DeCrow, 32, of Evans, Ga.; Capt. John Gaffaney, 56, of San Diego, Calif.; Spc. Frederick Greene, 29, of Mountain City, Tenn.; Spc. Jason Dean Hunt, 22, of Frederick, Okla., Sgt. Amy Krueger, 29, of Kiel, Wis.; Pfc. Aaron Thomas Nemelka, 19, of West Jordan, Utah; Pfc. Michael Pearson, 22, of Bolingbrook, Ill.; Capt. Russell Seager, 51, of Racine, Wis.; Pvt. Francheska Velez, 21, of Chicago; Lt. Col. Juanita Warman, 55, of Havre de Grace, Md.; and Pfc. Kham Xiong, 23, of St. Paul, Minn. A trial for Nidal Hasan, who is charged in the shooting rampage that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded, starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013. (AP Photo, File)

  • Alonzo Lunsford

    In this Tuesday, June 4, 2013, photo, retired Staff Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford walks down the steps of his home in Lillington, N.C. Nearly three dozen soldiers, including Lunsford, who was wounded in the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas are facing the prospect of being approached and questioned in court by the man many witnesses have identified as the gunman: Maj. Nidal Hasan. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

  • Alonzo Lunsford

    In this Tuesday, June 4, 2013, photo, photos of Staff Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford recovering from his wounds after the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood, Texas are displayed on a desk at his home in Lillington, N.C. Nearly three dozen soldiers wounded in the deadly attack on the Texas Army post are facing the prospect of being approached and questioned in court by the man many witnesses have identified as the gunman: Maj. Nidal Hasan. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

  • Alonzo Lunsford

    In this Tuesday, June 4, 2013, photo, retired Staff Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford describes one of his wounds from the 2009 Fort Hood shooting rampage, at his home in Lillington, N.C. Nearly three dozen soldiers wounded in the deadly attack on the Texas Army post are facing the prospect of being approached and questioned in court by the man many witnesses have identified as the gunman: Maj. Nidal Hasan. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE- In this July 20, 2011, file photo, U.S. Army military police walk out of the Lawrence H. Williams Judicial Center where a hearing for U.S. Army Major Nidal Hasan was being conducted in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan is charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the rampage, but military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. If he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, there are likely years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE- In this Nov. 10, 2009, file photo, soldiers salute as they honor victims of the Fort Hood shooting at a memorial service at Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the rampage, but military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. If he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, there are likely years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE - This June 11, 2013, file courtroom sketch shows U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, right, sitting by his former defense attorneys Maj. Joseph Marcee, far left, and Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, center, during a hearing at Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan is charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the rampage, but military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. If he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, there are likely years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley, File)

  • John Rossi, Steven Braverman

    FILE- In this Nov. 6, 2009, file photo, Col. (P) John Rossi, Deputy Commander General of Fires and Effects, and Col. Steven Braverman, Commander of Carl R. Darnall Army Medical Center, address reporters during a news conference following a mass shooting at Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the rampage, but military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. If he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, there are likely years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. (AP Photo/Killeen Daily Herald, David Morris, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE- In this Nov. 5, 2009, file image released by the U.S. Army, emergency workers prepare the wounded for transport in waiting ambulances near Fort Hood's Soldier Readiness Processing Center in Fort Hood, Texas. Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood that left 13 dead and more than 30 others wounded. Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the rampage, but military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. If he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, there are likely years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. (AP Photo/U.S. Army, Jeramie Sivley, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    The Lawrence H. Williams Judicial Center is shown behind a protective barrier as jury selection begins, Tuesday, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. An Army psychiatrist going on trial in the deadly 2009 Fort Hood shooting wants to tell potential jurors that he's being forced to wear a military uniform he believes represents "an enemy of Islam," he told a judge Tuesday. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • Nidal Hasan, Kris Pope, Tara Osborn, Larry Downend, Mike Mulligan, Steven Henricks

    In this courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, left sitting, sits by his former defense attorney, Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, left rear, as Judge Tara Osborn, behind bench, watches prosecutor Maj. Larry Downend, standing, question potential jurors with fellow prosecutors Col. Mike Mulligan, center front, and Col. Steven Henricks, right, looking on, Tuesday, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan faces execution or life without parole if convicted in the 2009 rampage that killed 13 and wounded nearly three dozen on the Texas Army post. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

  • Tara Osborn, Nidal Hasan, Joseph Marcee, Kris Poppe

    In this courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, right, sits by his former defense attorneys Maj. Joseph Marcee, far left, and Lt. Col. Kris Poppe, center, with Judge, Col. Tara Osborn, behind the bench during a pretrial hearing, Tuesday, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Jury selection is set to start Tuesday in the long-awaited murder trial of Hasan, the Army psychiatrist accused of opening fire with a semi-automatic gun at Fort Hood nearly four years ago. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    Television cameramen walk by a Fort Hood Police Mobile Command Center near the Lawrence H. WIlliams Judicial Center as a pretrial hearing gets underway, Tuesday, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas. Jury selection is set to start Tuesday in the long-awaited murder trial of Army psychiatrist Maj. Nidal Hasan, accused of opening fire with a semi-automatic gun at Fort Hood nearly four years ago. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

  • Nidal Hasan

    FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2012 courtroom sketch, U.S. Army Maj. Nidal Hasan, center foreground with back showing, is seen sitting between members of is defense team during a hearing in Fort Hood, Texas. The Army psychiatrist charged in the 2009 shooting rampage at Fort Hood is paralyzed from the waist down, after being shot by police that day. A judge has permitted him to represent himself at trial, but his compromised health means that his upcoming court martial will have shorter periods of testimony, more breaks and possible lengthy delays to write legal motions. (AP Photo/Brigitte Woosley, File)

  • Fort Hood Shooting

    FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2009, file photo, a memorial to victims of the Fort Hood shooting is shown before the start of a memorial service, to be attended by President Barack Obama, at Fort Hood, Texas. Osama bin Laden is dead and there hasn’t been a successful attack by al-Qaida-inspired extremists on U.S. soil since the deadly shooting rampage in Fort Hood, Texas, in 2009. But the danger of terrorism remains a reality for Americans, as seen in the attack in Libya in September that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)