Huffpost Politics

Arlen Specter Released From Hospital, Battling Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Posted: Updated:
In this June 6, 2009 file photo, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter, D-Pa., addresses the Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee Meeting in Pittsburgh. Specter, Pennsylvania's longest serving U.S. Senator, is hosting a pilot episode of a public affairs show that airs Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 on Maryland Public Television. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
In this June 6, 2009 file photo, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter, D-Pa., addresses the Pennsylvania Democratic State Committee Meeting in Pittsburgh. Specter, Pennsylvania's longest serving U.S. Senator, is hosting a pilot episode of a public affairs show that airs Friday, Jan. 13, 2012 on Maryland Public Television. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

PHILADELPHIA — Former Sen. Arlen Specter, who has already survived two bouts of Hodgkin's disease, is now battling non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, according to his son's law firm.

A statement released Friday said Specter, 82, had been released from a Philadelphia hospital but was expected to return there for additional treatment.

Specter said in a statement last week that he was again fighting cancer.

"It's another battle I intend to win," Specter wrote. "I'm grateful for all the well wishes I've received."

Specter, who was Pennsylvania's longest-serving senator before losing a primary in 2010, has overcome Hodgkin's disease, a cancer of the lymphatic system, twice since 2005. He also has survived a brain tumor and cardiac arrest after bypass surgery.

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is a broad description for a number of blood cancers primarily affecting white blood cells in the lymph tissue. It can be treated with radiation or chemotherapy.

Specter's 30-year Senate career ended after he switched from the Republican Party to the Democratic Party and lost the subsequent primary, and Pennsylvania voters elected conservative Republican Pat Toomey, then a congressman, to replace him.

Also on HuffPost:

Close
Health Care Reform Efforts Throughout History
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

Barack Obama Promised A New Kind Of Politics, But Played The Same Old Game