Despite the fact that second and third "Avatar" films are still years away from hitting theaters, director James Cameron and producer Jon Landau can't seem to stop talking about "Avatar 4."

Just last week, Landau told the Courier-Post that while plans are in motion to shoot "Avatar 2" and "Avatar 3" back-to-back, "Avatar 4" won't happen just yet. That jibed with what Cameron told the New York Times in July about how any "Avatar 4" discussion was "premature," but the film was not out of the question.

Now, in a new interview with MTV, Cameron claims he's got an idea for "Avatar 4."

"I haven't really put pen to paper on it, but basically it goes back to the early expeditions of Pandora, and kind of what went wrong with the humans and the Na'vi and what that was like to be an explorer and living in that world," Cameron said.

Thus, the fourth film would be a possible prequel, with potential for additional prequel features after that.

"We'll start, not imitating 'Star Wars,'" Cameron added, "but it's a logical thing to do because we'll have completed the thematic arc by the end of three."

Before any of that, however, "Avatar 2" has to get made. Cameron has previously stated the sequel probably won't hit theaters until 2015, at the earliest. Fans still needing that trip to Pandora can pick up "Avatar" on Blu-ray 3D starting on Oct. 16.

For more on Cameron's plans for "Avatar 4," head over to MTV.

[via MTV]

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  • This February 2012 file photo provided by National Geographic, shows explorer and filmmaker James Cameron emerging from the hatch of DEEPSEA CHALLENGER during testing of the submersible in Jervis Bay, south of Sydney, Australia. Cameron on Sunday, March 25, 2012 began his journey to someplace only two men have gone before �-- to the Earth's deepest point. The director of "Titanic," ''Avatar" and other films is using the specially designed submarine to descend nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, an area 200 miles (320 kilometers) southwest of the Pacific island of Guam. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen, File)

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron gets a handshake from ocean explorer and U.S. Navy Capt. Don Walsh, right, just before the hatch on the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible is closed and the voyage to the deepest part of the ocean begins, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron is the first person to complete the dive solo. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible carrying filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is hoisted into the Pacific Ocean on its way to the "Challenger Deep," the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, Sunday, March 25, 2012. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • This February 2012 handout photo provided by National Geographic shows the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible begining its first test dive off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Earth's lost frontier, the deepest part of the oceans where the pressure is like three SUVs sitting on your little tow, is about to be explored first-hand. It's been more than half a century since man dared to plunge that deep. Earth's lost frontier is about to be explored firsthand after more than half a century. It's a mission to the deepest part of the ocean, so deep that the pressure is the equivalent of three SUVs sitting on your toe. And it's being launched by the rich and famous. In the next several days, James Cameron, the director of �"Titanic,�" �"Avatar�" and �"The Abyss,�" plans to dive nearly 7 miles deep in a one-man sub he helped design. The location is the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific. �"It's the last frontier for science and exploration on this planet,�" Cameron said. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, National Geographic)

  • In an image provided by National Geographic filmmaker James Cameron gives two thumbs-up as he emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible Monday March 26, 2012 after his successful solo dive in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

  • Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible after his successful solo dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, Monday March 26, 2011. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic) ONE TIME USE

  • In a photo provided by National Geographic filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron holds the National Geographic Society flag after he successfully completed the first ever solo dive to the Mariana Trench Monday March 26, 2012. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

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