Cheap Trick drummer Bun E. Carlos was surprised to find himself left off a new recording by the band. The song, which is included in a Christmas album that benefits the Special Olympics, also appears to have been recorded without the permission of Carlos.

Carlos has been taking time off from touring with the band. In the meantime, he has founded and played with Candy Golde, which features a number of musicians in other bands. He's also a member of Tinted Windows. But in an email sent to Billboard, Carlos insists that he never left Cheap Trick.

"I'm a full member of Cheap Trick in all respects," he said. "Solely as an accommodation to some of the band members, I reluctantly agreed to take a temporary hiatus from touring. The other members have never seriously talked to me about my leaving the band permanently."

The drummer isn't sure what type of action - if any -- he'll take against the group. Daxx Nielsen (guitarist Rick Nielsen's son) has been filling in for Carlos.

Carlos is an original member of the band, which was formed in the early 1970s and is best known for hits like "The Flame," "I Want You to Want Me" and "Surrender."

It's not the first time bands have made music -- or threatened to -- without a standing member of the act. Bloc Party has had to fend off breakup rumors ever since the lead singer, Kele Okereke told reporters he was off doing his own solo project. Since then, the band reunited and released a new album.

Here's the statement Carlos posted on his website:

Bun E Carlos, Cheap Trick's founding member and longtime drummer joins all Cheap Trick fans in supporting the Special Olympics, but wants all his fans to know that he was not invited to participate in the track attributed to Cheap Trick scheduled to be on the Special Olympics Christmas album. Bun E stated, "There are no Led Zeppelin records without John Bonham and there's no Leave It To Beaver without Jerry Mathers! I remain humbled and grateful for the support of Cheap Trick's fans and please support www.specialolympics.org and their very important initiatives."

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