The "Heathers" are back.

Bravo is set to bring the 1980s cult classic, "Heathers," to the small screen in a new scripted series.

The 1988 film "Heathers" starred Winona Ryder as Veronica, who was part of the most popular group of girls at Westerburg High School. Along with Veronica was the evil leader Heather Chandler (Kim Walker), the brainy bulimic Heather Duke (Shannen Doherty) and the gullible cheerleader Heather McNamara (Lisanne Falk).

The reboot version of "Heathers" will take place in the present day, picking up 20 years after the movie left off. Veronica moves back to Sherwood with her teenage daughter, who enters high school to deal with the next generation of mean girls, the “Ashleys,” daughters of the surviving “Heathers.”

Mark Rizzo ("The Man Date," "Zip") and Jenny Bicks ("The Big C," "Men In Trees") will executive produce the upcoming Bravo series. "Heathers" is a redevelopment of a project originally sold to Fox three years ago by Bicks and Sony Pictures Television, Variety reported back in 2009.

That same year, Ryder swore that a "Heathers" movie was in the works.

"I swear to God," she told Entertainment Weekly. "But for some reason Dan [Waters, writer] and Michael [Lehmann, director] don't want to talk about it. There is a story, and Christian [Slater] has agreed to come back as a kind of Obi-Wan character."

The show is a new move for Bravo, a network known for its reality programs like "The Real Housewives," "Inside the Actor's Studio," "Top Chef," and "Flipping Out."

“Through our growing slate of scripted development we plan to build upon the success of our award-winning unscripted programming , accessing and exploring new worlds and characters while still engaging the same affluent and pop culture savvy audience that watches the Real Housewives and Top Chef,” said Andrew Wang, vice president for scripted development and production. “We’re excited to partner with such high caliber talent in developing TV that pushes boundaries conceptually and thematically while still telling a fun story in the way that our audiences have come to expect from us.”

Bravo also announced four other scripted series.

  • "The Apartment" will follow two twentysomethings who inherit the apartment where their mother carried on an 18-year affair and rent it out to other philandering lovers.
  • "The Darlings" is based on the acclaimed novel by Cristina Alger about a family's downfall after being pulled into a Ponzi scheme scandal.
  • "All American Girl," written by Jenni Ross, is loosely based on Ross' mother's time spent as Fashion Editor at Seventeen magazine. It will follow three generations of women working for the magazine All American Girl.
  • "Rita" is an adaptation of a Danish series that tells the story of a private school teacher trying to raise her three teenage kids and deal with the troublesome parents at her school.

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