The White House questioned the "judgment" behind the decision of the French magazine Charlie Hebdo to publish cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad on Wednesday.

According to Reuters, White House press secretary Jay Carney told reporters that while the Obama administration does not question the right to free speech in regards to the cartoons' stance, "we just question the judgment behind the decision to publish it."

"We know that these images will be deeply offensive to many and have the potential to be inflammatory. But we've spoken repeatedly about the importance of upholding the freedom of expression that is enshrined in our constitution," Carney added.

The French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo published caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad that referenced the recent controversy over the anti-Islam film "Innocence of Muslims."

The Associated Press reports that the French government defended Charlie Hebdo's right to publish the cartoons, but tightened security around some of its embassies and urged its citizens abroad to exercise caution.

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  • Publishing director of the satyric weekly Charlie Hebdo, Charb, holds the newspaper as he talks to the media in Paris, on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/MIchel Euler)

  • Publishing director of the satyric weekly Charlie Hebdo, Charb, gestures as he talks to the media in Paris, on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/MIchel Euler)

  • Publishing director of the satyric weekly Charlie Hebdo, Charb, displays the front page of the newspaper as he poses for photographers in Paris, on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/MIchel Euler)

  • A French policeman stands guard outside the headquarters of the satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in Paris, on Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2012. (AP Photo/MIchel Euler)

  • Satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo's editor in chief, Charb, answers reporters in front of the headquarters of the newspaper, that "invited" the Prophet Muhammad as a guest editor this week, in Paris, Nov. 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

  • A police officer stands in front of the headquarters of satiric French newspaper Charlie Hebdo, that "invited" the Prophet Muhammad as a guest editor this week, in Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

  • A police officer stands front of the headquarters of satiric French newspaper Charlie Hebdo, that "invited" the Prophet Muhammad as a guest editor this week, in Paris, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2011. A police official said the fire broke out overnight at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, and the cause remains unclear. No injuries were reported. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because an investigation into the fire is under way. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)